Representation of the People Act 1918

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    AP-Suffrage In England

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    "Describe the steps taken between 1832 and 1918 to extend the suffrage in England. What group and movements contributed to the extension of the vote?" Several groups, movements and reform bills passed between 1832 and 1918 extended the suffrage in England. The process took many years and the voting rights were first given to the wealthier and more distinguished men, then later to the less wealthy men, and finally to women. The major reform bills that extended the suffrage in England were the Reform

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    through it” -Rosemary Brown--politician and activist Rosemary Brown was a politician in Canada who worked tirelessly for the advancement of equality here. This quote shows her views and beliefs in her work; that equality was something that people must fight to achieve, then keep the opportunities and advancements open for those in the future. The fact that this was achieved in Canada makes the Women’s Movement defining in its importance. The progression Canada saw in the 1900s was important

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    Bail Reform Act of 1984 History 1) Judiciary Act of 1789 <ul> <li> Defined bailable offenses and established judicial limits on setting bail <li> All noncapital offenses were bailable <li> Bail was left to the discretion of the federal judge </ul> 2) Bail Reform Act of 1966 <ul> <li> Established a statutory presumption in favor of pretrial release in all noncapital cases <li> Primarily concerned with defendant's flight <li> Attempt to set reasonable conditions of pretrial release

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    Suffragists outnumbered the Suffragettes by a large amount and it was the Suffragists that successfully lobbied for the Representation of People Act 1918. Source 2 In this article, Trueman argues that the Suffragettes and the Suffragists complemented each other, that the women’s role in the war effort had no effect on the success of the1918 Representation of People Act and that this act was an injustice to the fight of the Suffraggettes and Suffragists.

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    Suffragettes Essay

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    that the work of the Suffragists, the Suffragettes and Women’s War Work all contributed to some extent into changing the attitudes of men, which therefore allowed women to receive the vote in 1918. This ultimately, confirms changing attitudes to be the most important factor. The representation of the people act extended the vote to all males over 21 and to males who were 19 and had been on active service during the war. The vote was also extended to women over the age of 30 who were householders, the

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    first ‘total war’ which utilised the entire civilian population and thus provided women with a strong sense of responsibility, not just to their partners/sons/brothers, but also to the overall effort. It is estimated that from summer 1914 to summer 1918 1,659,000 women entered the labour-force, which is a good initial indicator of the strength of women’s participation. However, historians seldom discuss the effects of the war on women from Socially, World War I also had a great impact on women’s

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    Although the War did damage the cohesion of the Liberal Party, it is important to acknowledge the Party’s existent structural issues, which arguably initiated its decline in the years before the War. George Dangerfield argues that despite the Liberal landslide victory in the 1906 elections, ‘the death of liberalism was pronounced’ when fifty-three Labour representatives had also been elected. This rise in support for the Labour Party could be linked to issues such as Labour unrest, Suffragette militancy

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    Women After Ww1 Analysis

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    The source shows an extract from the BBC Website in 2008, states how women benefited from the war, both politically, and in terms of equality, as shown in February 1918, where they receive the right to vote, in the "Representation of People Act" (exclusive only women over 30), which led to 8 million women being eligible to vote by 1918, showing female advancement in politics. The source is also accurate in saying that role of women was significant during WW1 (60% of all shells were

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    Suffragettes really made. Many argue that it was womens’ effort in the First World War that made the most difference to women obtaining the vote in 1918,

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    would take responsibility in political matters’ . Prior to 1918, women were not allowed to vote in parliamentary elections. In the UK there were many groups advocating for women’s suffrage who believed the in the philosophy of ‘deeds not words’ Hunger strikes were common with women who were imprisoned for political reasons, this creating large publicity. The Prisoners' Temporary Discharge for Ill-Health Act, also known as 'The Cat and Mouse Act' was passed in 1913. This permitted the early

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