Analysis Of Stanley Milgram 's ' The Milgram Obedience '

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One of the most well-known experimentations in submission in psychology the famous Milgram obedience study conducted by Stanley Milgram, social psychologist who worked at Yale University during the 1960s, and the ethical guidelines that should have been integrated with his research. Stanley Milgram’s aim was to study whether the German population were predominantly compliant to imposing figures which was a collective thought for the Nazi massacres that happened during the course of World War II. Milgram’s study dishonored the regulations and procedures for moral human experiments brought on by the British Psychological Society.
The most important questions that Stanley Milgram attempted to answer was could he get individuals to electrocute and cause serious harm to other human beings and if so then could events like the Holocaust occur again. He wanted to see if every normal people who were good and caring have the ability to act callous and inhumanely without any regard toward human safety. His goal was to understand obedience and authority and under what conditions would someone obey authority and carry out order and commands that demanded cruel and unusual punishment. The experiment consisted of a number of participants that were instructed to teach an individual deemed a “learner” pairs of words and administer an electric shock if they gave an incorrect response. With each incorrect response, the electric shock was amplified, despite the fact the the participant had
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