Analysis Of The Vibrator Play

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In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play) brought its audience back in time to a late nineteenth century Victorian household, newly furnished with electric lamps and fully functioning vibrators for an at home gynecologist/ therapist. After viewing the show, I left the invited dress performance with some serious respect and admiration for the talented cast, the production team and designers that created the beautiful ambience of the next room, and the vision of Lisa Gaye Dixon. I’ve chosen to reflect on the human significance and the relation to theatre itself that “In the Next Room” made. As well as, focus of the impact that the set, lighting and sound, and costumes had on the delivery of the story, production, and entertainment value.…show more content…
I think that they also rushed into having a baby, they are not functioning at the same pace and not from a place of love. It feels formulated, calculated, and structured like a science experiment or part of Dr. Givings’ therapeutic treatments. Mrs. Givings learns from the artist, Leo, that orgasms detached from love ultimately are unfulfilling and empty, without soul, simply surface. After Mrs. Givings and Mrs. Daldry use the vibrators on each other, they both have arousing experiences. Mrs Daldry's experience was reawakening pleasure which is reflected in her change of mood and growing affection and connection to her husband. Mrs. Givings’ experience was introducing her to a sensation that was foreign to her, didn’t feel good but it didn’t feel wrong. Disconnected like her relationship with her husband, lacking the spark, lacking love. Both Mrs. Givings and Mrs. Daldry learn from Elizabeth (Maya Prentiss), the wet nurse, that one can enjoy the sensations from the machine with her husband. Elizabeth says, “Do you not think, Mrs. Givings, that snow is always kind? Because it has to fall slowly, to meet the ground smoothly, or the eyelash slowly- And things that meet each other slowly are kind”. This quote brought me to think, when Dr. and Mrs. Givings both recognize that what they desire most can’t be found in a guidebook, can not be observed through patients experiences, love and contentment can not be prescribed in a daily dose of orgasmic treatments. Organisms
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