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Analysis of The Frivolity of Evil Essay

Decent Essays
Dalrymple’s Thesis In his 2004 City Journal article, Theodore Dalrymple expresses his view on the tremendous decline in the quality of life in Great Britain. He believed that society has accepted the notion that people are not responsible for their own problems. Also, that it is the “moral cowardice of the intellectual and political elites” that perpetuates the social dynamics that are responsible for the continuing decline of British society. According to the author, a physician about to retire after a career treating criminal justice offenders and victims, there are several pervasive misconceptions that explain the continuing decline of British society. The first misconception claims that there is the notion that…show more content…
The following point is reinforced by detailing the dynamic between physicians and patients in relation to the contemporary treatment of “depression.” He describes the doctor as an enabler who stands as an “obstacle.” The said doctor prevents the patient’s ability to understand that what we typically refer to as “depression,” is nothing more than the predictable emotions associated with unhappiness after making bad life choices. Dalrymple implies that physicians cannot help most of their “depressed” patients without abandoning their profession’s commitment to objective disinterest in the voluntary choices of patients. In order to validate his third point, Dalrymple recounts some of the examples of the direct causative relationship between bad choices made by patients (and victims) he has encountered. Specifically, he explains how easily any person of reasonable intelligence could have, and should have been able to avoid making the decisions that were responsible for the situations precipitating their encounter with him in a clinical setting. They include battered and abused women who continually choose exactly the kind of men who obviously pose related risks, as well as irresponsible men and women who repeatedly
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