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Aristotle, A World-Renowned Greek Philosopher Once Noted

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Aristotle, a world-renowned Greek philosopher once noted a tragedy is “the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself...in a dramatic, not in a narrative form; with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions (Bywater, 1920, p. 35).” These words encapsulate the perception that tragedy is a mimicry surrounded by an underlying purpose through a direct action that arouses the audience’s emotions of fear and relief by witnessing a dreadful or gripping change that happens to the protagonist. Between Greek and Elizabethan times, characters were developed to portray tragic people, who possessed flaws that created drastic consequences for them in the…show more content…
Cordelia chose to be truthful with her father instead of lying like her sisters, which caused her to be disowned, thus establishing the central conflict to arise within the kingdom. In relation, Jason ridded Medea as a wife and began an affair with the Princess of Corinth “to make provision for you [Medea] and the children (Euripides, 1993, p.15)”. Even though he thought this would benefit Medea and their children, his rash judgment proved similar to Cordelia’s situation, as this produced problems between Medea and Jason, which later is shown to be detrimental to Jason. Although their flaws caused tragedy to strike, Cordelia and Jason remained consistent in their behaviors throughout the play and never changed who they truly were.
Consistency of a character’s attributes and traits during a play tends to create a more believable character and storyline. According to Poetics, a written theory by Aristotle, it states that the second most important element in a tragedy is a character that never does or says anything that will be seen as “acting out of character” (cited in Lonardo, 2012). When a character does something that is against their better judgment, it makes it difficult for the audience to accept that what they are doing is the right course of action. Furthermore, Aristotle goes on to specify that for a character to be considered a
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