Aspects Of The Arthurian Romance In Sir Gawain And The Green Knight

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Romantic works of the Arthurian age have existed over a number of eons tracing back to quite a number of languages native to the writers that immortalized the tales, this including Welsh, English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch and Scandinavian. Medieval romance is defined by the ideals that stood out from the tales including the romance, honor, loyalty and the moral authority as well as it explicated the social order which left a lot to be desired of the position of feminism in the society. Marie de France perhaps the only female write of her time has quite a number of Arthurian tales to her name up to including Equitan, Le Fresne, Bisclavret, Larval, Yonec, Laustic, Chaitivel and Chevrefoil. Her two works, Lanval and…show more content…
Love,' she said, 'I admonish you now, I command and beg you, do not let any man know about this...”. Women although generally seen as the weaker sex always garnered a subliminal wand of control over their men.

The romantic tales also apparently make it is oblivious of what the medieval concept of what the feminine figure represented and the role they played in the society. In the medieval literature, the role played by female often is a representation of many familiar traits and characteristics which the society still preserves. The issue of beauty, grace, attractiveness, loyalty and honesty almost completely exemplify the powerful attributes of women in both present and in the past. In medieval literature it separates the traits of women into distinct roles of women in the society. Women are seen to be the greatest gift to mankind revealing every thing that is good, beautiful and pure in the life. They are portrayed to share earnest love and pure honesty. Here Marie de France depicts her characters so. In Lanval and Cheverefoil the female characters are true to what their convictions, eliciting the deep feelings like love and loyalty regardless of the insinuated repercussions.
Women were seen as possessions of their men and were thus required to show loyalty. This is what the writers sought to capture whether compelled or not the female characters espoused loyalty. In Marie de France
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