Atlantis: The Lost City, Culture, and Continent Essays

2233 Words9 Pages
Everyone has heard the bedtime story of the golden lost city of Atlantis. It has been a child’s dream to discover it for decades, maybe centuries. This city has often been compared to the Garden of Eden. The birth of this fairytale lies with the Greek philosopher, Plato. Atlantis was modernly made popular by writer and U.S. Congressman, Ignatius Donnelly, in 1882 (Martin 12). According to Greek mythological history, Atlantis was founded by the god Poseidon and ruled by Atlas, a descendant of Poseidon’s ten sons of five pairs of twins, thus, the name Atlantis and Atlantic Ocean (McMullen 28; Martin 9). Plato recorded that this great civilization was “230 miles wide and 340 miles long” (Martin 7). Many questions have haunted the fervent…show more content…
Yet today, the story seems feasible to many. The text of Plato tells a story of a story being told. It starts by Critias recalling the day of the Apaturia, “which is called the Registration of Youth,” (Plato 205) when the little boys were to recite old poems in order to receive presents from their parents. On that day, he chose to recite one of Solon’s poems. Critias, himself, heard the story from the ninety year old man, Solon, who received the tale from an Egyptian priest. Critias stated that, Now Solon – as indeed he often says himself in his poems – was a relative and very dear friend of our great-grandfather Dropides; and Dropides told our grandfather Critias – as the old man himself, in turn, related to us – that the exploits of this city in olden days the record of which had perished through time and the destruction of its inhabitants (Plato 216). Critias continues by evoking what the priest said to Solon. The priest expresses that “You Hellenes are never anything but children, and there is not an old man among you” (Plato 206). He was referring to the fact that the Hellenes, or Greeks, are destroyed by natural disasters too often for old men to be amongst them. This intrigues Solon and he asks for more information about these previous lost generations and their world, leading to the great old story of Atlantis being told. (Plato 206) Is the chronicle of Atlantis even possible? There are many counts of
Open Document