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Black Americans And The Criminal Justice System

Decent Essays
The criminal justice system in the United States is evident of several deep flaws relating to the treatment of black men and women accused of committing criminal offenses. It is logical to believe that due to the U.S.’s rather dark past surrounding the treatment of black Americans, systematic racism is included under the guise of the criminal justice system. The U.S. is historically infamous for it’s open racial discrimination against black Americans, up until systematic racism became one of the more dominant forms of discrimination in the most recent years. Systematic racism has been shrouded under societal ignorance and regulated particularly by social and political groups in order to keep the human rights of black Americans frigid and…show more content…
Certain law enforcers with racist ideals will sometimes exploit their position of power unfairly to target black Americans, or “racially profile”. In some cases, especially in conservative states, it’s been known for police departments to advise their officers to suspect race in a key element of determining criminal activity. This detrimental generalization based on race has snowballed out of control, taking to events like the War on Drugs (find an article on the war on drugs and racial discrimination within to support your assertion).

Another cause in the spike of black inmates is the push for prisons to remain functioning and full of inmates. The U.S. has the largest incarceration rate compared to any other country in the world, and according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the majority of those imprisoned in 2006 were black citizens at approximately 4.8%, whereas Hispanic inmates make up 1.9%, and white inmates make up 0.7% ( BJS.gov). Many will argue that the reason the rate is so high is because of the lack of education/lower class status of black communities, but evidence points toward how some law enforcers racially profile or are informed to do so when suspecting criminal activity, especially so with black people.

In Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, Alexander explains how racism in the U.S. has been “redesigned” in order to be written off as nearly nonexistent (Alexander, 2). Alexander goes on to
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