Charles Dickens ' A Tale Of Two Cities

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When people go through traumatic experiences, they often tend to have a different perspective of the world around them. Dickens puts his characters through many distinct personal struggles that end up shaping who they are. Although each of these struggles was particular to each of the characters, they all were affected in some way, whether that be in a positive or negative light. Throughout the course of the novel A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens toys with the idea of personal change to develop the ambiguity of the characters Sydney Carton, Ernest Defarge, and Madame Defarge. Out of all of the characters that Dickens has created, Madame Defarge has gone through the most appalling events. Overall, Madame Defarge is relatively stern and cold…show more content…
Madame Defarge’s father died of grief when he heard the horrible news about his kin. These are the events that have shaped Madame Defarges personality.
While most people see her as a force not to be reckoned with, many don’t know why she is so stone cold when the reader is first introduced to her. Dickens infested Madame Defarge’s past, which made her turn to hating the aristocracy so much. Dickens really lets the reader know how much she hates Charles and his family by saying: “It was nothing to her, that an innocent man was to die for the sins of his forefathers; she saw, not him, but them. It was nothing to her, that his wife was to be made a widow and his daughter an orphan; that was insufficient punishment, because they were her natural enemies and her prey, and as such had no right to live. To appeal to her, was made hopeless by her having no sense of pity, even for herself” (Dickens 643). But since the reader doesn’t know any of the reasons why she hates them so, there is a cloud of ambiguity that surrounds her. Not even some of the people closest to her know her struggles and why she is the way that she is, and no one would have ever found out if Defarge wouldn’t have found the letter that Doctor Manette wrote about that night.
Madame Defarge isn’t the only wine shop owner that has an enigmatic aura about them. Ernest Defarge, much like his wife, has a strong hate that is directed toward the aristocracy, due to watching
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