Charles’ Law in Respiratory Care Essay

693 Words 3 Pages
The same forces that impact the compressed oxygen Respiratory Therapists handle every day, effect the work and outcome of breathing in the human body. The gas law, Charles’ Law, demonstrates the relationship between a contained volume of gas and its temperature, a directly proportional relationship. It states that in a contained space, if a gas’ temperature were to increase, the volume of the gas would increase as well (Colbert, et al., 2012). Charles’ Law is confirmed every day inside and outside a hospital, and it is especially important to understand when working with the human body. Most people, at one time or another, have seen the warning labels on aerosol cans warning against heating to extreme temperatures, and most medical …show more content…
The same forces that impact the compressed oxygen Respiratory Therapists handle every day, effect the work and outcome of breathing in the human body. The gas law, Charles’ Law, demonstrates the relationship between a contained volume of gas and its temperature, a directly proportional relationship. It states that in a contained space, if a gas’ temperature were to increase, the volume of the gas would increase as well (Colbert, et al., 2012). Charles’ Law is confirmed every day inside and outside a hospital, and it is especially important to understand when working with the human body. Most people, at one time or another, have seen the warning labels on aerosol cans warning against heating to extreme temperatures, and most medical personnel can verify the same about compressed oxygen. The rapid expansion of compressed gas and aerosol due to excessive temperatures, is responsible for shooting any compressed cylinder, can of hairspray to a four-foot oxygen cylinder, ten feet high, damaging anything in its way in the process. This exhibition of Charles’ Law is why storage of oxygen cylinders is so vitally important in the healthcare field and with patients alike. Less dramatic than an uncontrolled compressed projectile, is the display of Charles’ Law in the everyday work of breathing. Primarily seen in the humidification of dry, cool air, the nasopharynx is responsible for warming inspired air to body temperature. In respiratory patients with bypassed upper-airways, such as
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