Critical Analysis Of Richard Georg Strauss's An Alpine Symphony

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Richard Georg Strauss was born June 11th, 1864, he was one of the leading German composers of the late Romantic and early Modern eras. He is known for his operas such as Elektra, Die Frau one Schatten, and Salome. The composition I am going to analyze from Richard Strauss is his “An Alpine Symphony.” An Alpine Symphony begins in low volume, leaving me with a feeling of suspense. The instruments that commenced the piece was a fragment of the string section known as the second violins. The string section completely joined in but became over taken by a fragment of the brass section which was the trombones. The trombones played a long note, this theme reminds me of a funeral because of how silent the musicians are playing their instruments.…show more content…
New instruments were introduced in this section, the instruments introduced are the timpani and the crash cymbals. The timpani and crash cymbals are two members of the percussion section. The timpani and crash cymbals brought back a sentimental value to me, making me feel happiness because a few years ago, I learned how to play both instruments for the Knox Pride of Troy Band. The two instruments bring in excitement, the crashing of the cymbals and the rumble of the timpani are two loud figures, I believe this section represents the composers emotion when he was waking up from a long night of sleep. Strauss probably felt an attachment to the day time because it is possible that he did his best work during the day time. The xylophone was ultimately annexed during this section as the final member of the percussion section. Like the previous section “Night”, the “light” section began to annex in the french horns, trombones, and string section. The strings along with the timpani and trombone added a dramatic feeling making me feel warm inside because of how clear and filled with emotion they played. The “light” section ends with an allegro movement of the timpani, the woodwinds join in, and the trumpets are officially
Partlow III introduced to end the section. The section kept a high volume, it would never drop, it would constantly rise piece by piece. One piece that did not effect me was the coda, because I was already used to the coda of the previous section,

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