Critical Analysis On Critical Care Nursing

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Spirituality in Critical Care Nursing:
Cancer Patient Population Critical care nursing can be a very intense job, whether there are in-depth skills that need to be formed frequently or it is a patient who needs lots of use of self from the nurse. In the cancer population within critical care this can be drastically increased since they need not only your technical skills, but your time and interpersonal skills to help them through all of what they are going through. A big part of critical care in general, and for cancer patients in critical care, can be spirituality and how that interacts with their disease. In the past spirituality was pushed to the back burner in the process of treating the patient’s disease and not the whole patient,
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Cancer patients in the critical care setting may more than likely be approaching the end of their life and need more than ever to receive spiritual care that can ease their anxiety, grief, and unresolved feelings about their disease process and approaching death. This type of care is one of the basic parts of giving patient-centered care so that the entire person is being treated to the fullest extent of the healthcare team’s ability. As stated by Ferrell, Otis-Green, and Economou (2013), “The need for transcendence or the existential ability to find meaning and purpose within their illness experience is an essential part of providing care from a biopsychosocial-spiritual perspective.” This viewpoint keeps the idea of spiritual care focused on the patients and how this kind of care can truly benefit the patient as well as the nurses in finding one more way to ease these patient’s minds and bodies.
In addition, death and dying are a very hard topic many nurses throughout the profession can attest to, but the care that nurses give prior, during, and after this process can be the most beneficial care they receive at such a harsh time in their lives. Nixon, Narayanasamy, and Penny (2013) discussed spiritual care with nurses on a neuro-oncology unit where they spoke of feeling very unprepared and uneasy in providing spiritual care in the fear that they would make a mistake in their approach with these patients, but
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