Essay On Translation Studies

1703 Words7 Pages
1. Introduction
Traditionally, approaches to translation studies have been focused upon the internal factors, i.e., the rules of linguistic conversion that guide the translation process. Translation is regarded as a process of seeking for linguistic equivalence between ST and TT, as Nida(1964) put it, the target text should be the closest natural equivalent to the original text.With the rise of “cultural turn” in translation studies, there emerges a new research trend that views translation as a culture-bound phenomenon, and places translation studies under a large historical and socio-cultural context.Various cultural theories begin to lend their forces to translation studies, resulting in a series of new approaches, such as cultural manipulative, feminism and postcolonial approaches to translation studies.Thus, translation is no longer viewed as a process of seeking for linguistic equivalence, but an interaction between two cultural systems.
Under the influence of “cultural turn”that greatly expands the width and breadth of translation studies, translators and scholars have gradually realized that translation, literary translation in particular, is a sort of “creative treason”: creative in the sense that the translator must make subjective efforts to
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He argues that creativity and treason are intrinsically entwined in translation and the act of translation is always a sort of creative treason: “treason” in the sense that the original text has to be placed into a completely unexpected referential frame (namely, utterly different linguistic environment); “creative” in the sense that the original text is to be given a brand new look, and an opportunity to have a new literary exchange with a larger scope of readers as
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