Evaluating Arguments For Film 's Magic Essay

1511 WordsNov 15, 20167 Pages
Evaluating Arguments in Film Although films are a relatively new form of art, they have shaped the modern world more than any other. It is true that visual art is equally compelling, but films appear as persuasive and capture the viewer’s emotions and interests. This effectiveness is on account of a movie’s magic, which is simply the cinematography techniques that filmmakers apply. These techniques are esoteric, and so hidden from the eyes of an ordinary viewer. Only trained eyes can detect the filmmakers’ approaches and judge whether or not they are relevant. When evaluating a film, one resort to two objects. As it were, the first is to assess the film’s magic, which refers to the ability of a film to capture and demand a viewer’s attention. Design, costumes, and lighting often appeal to this quarter. The second object is the film’s content. In other words, the story matters more than the representation. Through the story, the filmmakers can postulate an argument, which the viewers can subtly engage (Winkler 13). In many cases, the audience can forget the set designs and the costumes, but not the words and actions of the characters. “Troy” is one of the movies with a powerful argument. Indeed, “Troy” is an epic film, and would continue to entertain and educate for generations to come. It is a great film because of the presentation and the economic use of words. Each phrase seems to be in a perfect place. The film is an adaptation of Homer’s “Iliad,” a great story of
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