Frank Lloyd Wright : A Comparison Of Modern Architecture

988 Words4 Pages
Throughout my day trip to Chicago, Illinois as part of American Experience, there was one question that behind my experiences that guided my thoughts: “What does modern architecture mean?” It is a simple question to ask, but a much more difficult question to answer. After all, we hardly even recognize the styles behind the buildings we see and use everyday, let alone what those styles represent. However, after careful study of some of best examples of American architectural style, the answer to that question becomes very clear. My trip through the greater Chicago area began in the quiet suburb of Oak Park. Though not as recognizable a name as Chicago, the town was once home to many famous Americans. One such man was the main focus of my…show more content…
As I toured the home and studio in further detail, I also noted a certain foreign influence as well. When looking from the street, the front door is hidden behind a long Japanese-inspired path and garden known as the “path of discovery,” and Wright displays many Japanese art and prints within the house as well. Additionally, sculptures and murals along the walls throughout the house depict Greek, Egyptian, Native American, and Middle Eastern subjects. Though one could see this as contradicting Wright’s constant advocacy for architecture that does copy styles of other cultures, I see the inclusion of these elements as paying some small respect to cultures Wright himself found particularly intriguing, creating a house that fits his interests. After touring Wright’s home and studio, I took a short walk to another of Wright’s early creations, the Unity Temple. Designed in 1905, the temple is considered one of the first modern buildings in the world, taking Wright’s own natural style one step further and using it to accommodate the needs of the Unitarian Universalists, a faith described as modern, liberal, and progressive. With a small lot, Wright had no choice but to build up, creating a large concrete cube with no
Get Access