Globalization Is The Process By Which People, Cultures,

1476 WordsJan 15, 20176 Pages
Globalization is the process by which people, cultures, ideas, and goods are spread across the world, stimulating the synergy and assimilation of world economies and governments. It references a global economy built on free trade and the use of foreign labor markets to capitalize on revenue, along with the movement of people, ideas, and knowledge from sea to shining sea. The study of history shows us that globalization is not a new phenomenon, rather it has been occurring for centuries. Whether one looks at trade routes such as the Silk Road, or the colonization of countries in the Middle East by European superpowers, they will see that these were all routes to spread economic and governing systems. With the increased availability to…show more content…
The past few years have been highlighted by terrorist attacks, war, and humanitarian disasters, making the need for international cooperation ever increasing. Political globalization’s classic example is the United Nations, which was incepted to maintain world peace and foster an environment of cooperation between nations, in order to solve economic, cultural, and humanitarian issues. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights for example is regarded as, “A milestone document in the history of human rights,” according to the United Nations. It ensures the rights to life, liberty, and education, and proclaims that, “No one shall be held in slavery or servitude.” But what happens when members of the UN General Assembly violate these declarations? What happens when the United Nations turns a blind eye to genocide, torture, and mass exodus? The Holocaust, for example, was largely ignored by the international community for much of the Second World War. Western nations even denied fleeing Jews entrance into their countries. As the War came to an end and the dust settled, the international community turned its attention to Nazi Germany’s human rights violations, and the United Nations vowed, “Never again.” That promise was an empty one, as genocides would erupt in Rwanda, Kosovo, Bosnia, and Syria. Syria, in particular, is the most immediate case of the
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