HCA255 Health Care Access

1295 WordsFeb 24, 20156 Pages
Health Care Access in Arizona Heidi Haugen Grand Canyon University: HCA 255 February 1, 2015 Health Care Access in Arizona Recently the Untied States top priority has been to provide accessible and affordable health care to every American. Those that lack access to coverage find it much more difficult to seek proper treatment and when they do they maybe left with astronomical medical bills. The CommanWealth Fund found that one-third or thirty three percent of Americans forgo health care because of costs and one-fifth or twenty percent are thus left with medical bills that have problems being able to pay. The federal government, through the Affordable Care Act (2010), has mandated that every person have health coverage in order…show more content…
Governor Brewer also planned on taxing hospitals in order to receive funds for the program. Her reasoning in doing so is because Arizona already charges a two percent insurance premium tax and a provider tax on nursing homes (Roy, A. 2013). She also feels that by expanding Medicaid, hospitals will start to receive payment for services that would have otherwise not been paid for by those who are uninsured. For those adults with children that are not eligible for Medicaid but their income is not enough for private insurance, KidsCare was an option until it froze in January 2010 due to a cost-cutting effort. KidsCare is a state sponsored insurance program for low-income families that is part of the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Arizona is currently the only state that does not have a CHIP program which forces families that were on the program to partake in the health care exchange and pay for private insurance or forgo health coverage and be uninsured (Whiteman, M., 2014). The number of children covered at the time of the program freeze went from 45,000 to about 2,000, which was a ninety-five percent drop (Whiteman, M., 2014). Governor Jan Brewer proposed to restore coverage to thousand of children through KidsCare II, where Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Maricopa Integrated Health System, and the University of Arizona Health Network would pull money together and receive extra federal funds. The federal funds that the
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