How Does Shaw Present Eliza's Transformation

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Shaw’s creation of a romantic play with an atypical ending establishes and presents a sense of reality and honesty not ordinarily found within compositions similar to his. The real world is not full of happy endings, or at least not the expected ones. The Cinderella story of Eliza’s transformation is paralleled by that of a “Frankenstein creation of new life”, or Higgins molding of Eliza and her speech (2). The romance presented in the production is centered on Eliza and her ability to overcome obstacles and achieve something that just months prior seemed insurmountable, despite a lack of true education, she can pass herself off as a woman of truly high stature. Higgins’ affection for his creation, his Galatea, if there really is much, most…show more content…
Shaw did not intend for the relationship between Eliza and Higgins to ever be more than that of teacher and pupil and potentially eventual equals which illustrates something earnest. Shaw could not have ended the play on a note that felt more right. Eliza changes outwardly, in her appearance and overall physical presence, but she still values herself and stands her ground as she did before. She is tenacious and outspoken, if Shaw had made the relationship between Eliza and Higgins anything more than what it is, he would have had to sacrifice those qualities that make her so intriguing. A woman ahead of her time in a way, Eliza continuously reinforces that she would not degrade herself and did never intends to feel pliable to a man or subject to…show more content…
Shaw’s work of art is not about the fairy-tale happy ending but about something believable and sensible. Slowly over months Liza’s tough, “gutter”, exterior was chipped away to reveal Eliza, a woman capable of being called a duchess, but not one willing to sit down and serve another. Independence races through her and the moment she throws the slippers at Higgins pieces are being restored, she no longer will be a servant of his nor does she want any position that would make her one for the rest of her life. Any form of relationship to Higgins involving romantic attachment does not allow Eliza to be herself or to feel superior to anyone. Freddy offers the companionship she needs, with support, love, and no shadow to stand in. Shaw’s romance is more about the making of her person not of any relationship with another character, it is Eliza’s relationship with herself. Although Eliza’s self-worth was not determined by her standing in life she realized that she deserved more, she respected herself enough to know that Higgins was not the kind of man she would want a relationship with. She needed someone who cared for her passionately, not one who treated her just as he treated everyone else - badly. Eliza is strong and she finds it within herself to look for the love she deserves and the life she deserves without the constant ridicule of a man who will never truly respect another’s
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