Human Understanding In The Poetry Of Emily Dickinson's Poetry

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Emily Dickinson was an exceptional writer through the mid-late 1800’s. She never published any of her writings and it wasn’t until after her death that they were even discovered. The complexity of understanding her poems is made prevalent because of the fact that she, the author, cannot expound on what her writing meant. This causes others to have to speculate and decide for themselves the meaning of any of her poems. There are several ways that people can interpret Emily Dickinson’s poems; readers often give their opinion on which of her poems present human understanding as something boundless and unlimited or something small and limited, and people always speculate Dickinson’s view of the individual self. Firstly, readers decide on which of Emily Dickinson’s poems present human understanding as boundless and unlimited. Of course, for most this is all speculation, but this is one of Dickinson’s most prevalent poem that seems to present human understanding as boundless and unlimited. One example is, The Brain Is Wider Than The Sky is a poem that embodies this view of human understanding as boundless and unlimited. This poem’s main focus is the power and strength of the human brain or mind. This line from the text is a perfect representation of human understanding as boundless and unlimited, “The Brain-is wider than the Sky-...The one the other will contain”(Stanza 1, Line 1,3). These lines state the the brain or rather the mind is greater in size than the sky. It is saying
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