Katherine Kolcaba's Comfort Theory

3993 WordsJun 19, 201316 Pages
Katherine Kolcaba’s Comfort Theory Annette Hall St Joseph’s College of Maine Abstract Katherine Kolcaba’s Comfort Theory fits best with my philosophy of nursing and my current work environment. As a hospice nurse comfort is the top priority. The goal of hospice care is to provide comfort and dignity at the end of life. The technical term for comfort for health care is the immediate state of being strengthened by having the needs for relief, ease, and transcendence addressed in the four context of holistic human experience: physical, psychospiritual, sociocultural, and environment. The change goal would be to implement Kolcaba’s taxonomic structure of comfort as a way for the hospice unit staff to measure comfort. Katherine Kolcaba’s…show more content…
Evidence-based practice or policy improvements may be guided by these propositions and the theoretical framework (P. 234). Population According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, (NHPCO, 2012) in 2011, an estimated 1.65 million patients received services from hospice and an estimated 44.6% of all deaths in the United States were patients under hospice care. In 2001, an estimated 36.6% of cancer patients accessed three of more days of hospice care. The median length of service in 2011 was 19.1 days. 56.4% of hospice patients were female and 43.6% were male. 83.3% of hospice patients were 65 years of age or older, and more than one-third of all hospice patients were 85 years of age or older. 82.8% of hospice patients were white/Caucasian. Patients of minority (non-Caucasian) race accounted for more than one fifth of hospice patients. Today cancer diagnoses account for less than half of all hospice admissions (37.7%). Currently less than 25% of U.S. deaths are now caused by cancer, with the majority of death due to other terminal diseases. The top four non-cancer primary diagnoses for patients admitted to hospice in 2011 were debility, dementia, heart disease, and lung disease (NHPCO, 2012). Level of care There are four general levels of hospice care: routine home care, continuous home care, general inpatient care, and inpatient respite care. The facility where I currently
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