Megan Grogan. Mrs. Arnold. English 1301.78. 17 April 2017.

1564 WordsApr 13, 20177 Pages
Megan Grogan Mrs. Arnold English 1301.78 17 April 2017 To Save Another Sacrifice is something everyone has experienced in one way or another. For some, it has been as simple as giving someone their last piece of gum, but for others, it has been so much more. In John Steinbeck’s the Grapes of Wrath by Frank Galati, both Rose of Sharon and Jim Casy make major sacrifices. At the beginning of the play, Rose of Sharon starts out very childlike and self-concerned. Through events such as being abandoned by her husband and losing her baby, she grows into a more generous, mature, and self-sacrificing person. When Jim Casy is first introduced, he reveals that he is an ex-priest, who used to behave inappropriately with the ladies and has left…show more content…
In contrast, Jim Casy’s sacrifice is of a different nature than the one previously discussed. This difference can be seen at the strike camp outside of Hooper Ranch. Men with clubs storm the camp, with the main focus of finding Casy. After he has been pointed out, the men go after him; “The first man swings with the pick handle. Casy dodges down into the swing. The / heavy club crushes into the side of his head with a dull crunch of / bone and Casy falls sideways out of the light,” (Galati II). As a result of this attack, Casy dies. He sacrifices his life. While, as previously stated, this sacrifice may appear to differ greatly due to this distinction, the reality is that this is one of the only noteworthy differences in comparison to a plurality of similarities between Rose of Sharon and Jim Casy when it comes to sacrifice. However, in order to fully understand the similarities between the sacrifices of Rose of Sharon and Jim Casy, it is imperative that one understands and has a reliable knowledge of the play’s historical context. According to Unemployment During the Great Depression by John A. Garraty: “The Great Depression of the 1930s swept across most of the world like a blight or plague, swiftly and without warning. It produced much misery and suffering everywhere,” (133). This comparison offers an insight into the hardship produced by this time period and gives a representation of the
Open Document