Native Identity in Welch´s Winter in the Blood, The Heartsonh of Charging Elf, and Alexie´s Flight

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The construction of identity in Native American literature tends to be contingent on the trope of alienation. Protagonists then must come to terms with their exile/alienated condition, and disengage from the world in order to regain a sense of their pre-colonial life. In utilizing the plight of the American Indian, authors expose the effects decolonization and how individuals must undergo a process of recovery. Under these circumstances, characters are able reclaim knowledge of a tribal self that had been distorted by years of oppression. Through Welch’s Winter in the Blood and The Heartsong of Charging Elk, and Alexie’s Flight, we can see how the protagonists suffer from the tensions of living on the margins of conflicting societies, and …show more content…
The construction of identity in Native American literature tends to be contingent on the trope of alienation. Protagonists then must come to terms with their exile/alienated condition, and disengage from the world in order to regain a sense of their pre-colonial life. In utilizing the plight of the American Indian, authors expose the effects decolonization and how individuals must undergo a process of recovery. Under these circumstances, characters are able reclaim knowledge of a tribal self that had been distorted by years of oppression. Through Welch’s Winter in the Blood and The Heartsong of Charging Elk, and Alexie’s Flight, we can see how the protagonists suffer from the tensions of living on the margins of conflicting societies, and that they must overcome their alienations in order to reconnect with a native identity.
Within Winter in the Blood, Welch’s unnamed narrator continuously struggles for self-knowledge, but is thwarted by a highly disconnected past, present and future. In his many destabilizing events, the narrator is unable to connect himself to a cultural or spiritual center, which inevitably denies him of a coherent identity. Throughout the novel he is denied the explanation of his true grandfather, why “First Raise stayed away so much,” and other recollections within his own mind because “memory fails” him (Winter 21, 19). However, the one event the narrator manages to recall is of “when the old lady had related this story, many years ago, her eyes were
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