Natural Selection In Charles Darwin's On The Origin Of Species

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Understanding Natural Selection
Some scientific theories are widely accepted for great expanses of time, while others eventually fade from the scientific community. One of the most influential members of this community is Charles Darwin. His novel, On the Origin of Species, explains the theory of natural selection, which is based on naturally occurring competition among all forms of life. Like all theories, some people disagree with this idea. Nevertheless, there are many people who support the theory of natural selection. Logically, natural selection makes sense. In all areas of life, those individuals who are built to withstand the nature of their environment have a better chance at survival compared to those who are unfit for the environment. Although natural selection was first proposed over a hundred years ago, it still applies the modern world.
Of course, On the Origin of Species is written in a style unlike that which is used today. Some of the words are even spelled differently, such as color and organization, which, in Darwin’s novel, are written as colour and organisation. These specific variations from the language people use today are due to the time period during which the novel was written as well as Darwin’s own origin in the United Kingdom. Despite these inconsistencies with modern language, On the Origin of Species can still be read and understood by people today. Darwin’s writing is understandable, but those who read his novel may not be familiar with the
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