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S. Marcenscens Research Paper

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I was given unknown 18, after the gram stains and biological tests I concluded that unknown 18 is Serratia marcescens. S. marcenscens is a rod shaped, motile, gram-negative bacteria, it was first isolated in 1819 by Italian pharmacist, Bizio. The S. marcenscens first isolated came from polenta that was taking on an unusual bright red color. Initially S. marcenscens was believed to be nonpathogenic and was commonly used as a biological marker because of its unique red color (Merlino, 1924). It was not until the 1950’s that S. marcenscens was discovered to be pathogenic in humans (Wheat et al, 1951). S. marcenscens is an adaptable bacteria found in many different environments including water, soil, gastrointestinal tracts of many animals, but grow particularly well on starchy food sources (Petersen and Tisa, 2013). S. marcenscens when first isolated it was believed to be non-pathogenic, but S. marcenscens is responsible for nosocomial human infections, plant infections, insect and nematode infections, among many more (Petersen and Tisa, 2013). S. marcenscens is opportunistic and is known to cause nearly every possible infection imaginable including, urinary tract infections, upper respiratory infections,…show more content…
Wheat at the Stanford University Hospital recorded eleven cases of S. marcenscens causing an infection in humans in just six months (Wheat et al, 1951). The number of infections caused by S. marcenscens has been increasing since then (Hejazi and Falkiner, 1997). According to Petersen and Tisa (2013), there are many factors that make S. marcenscens such a ubiquitous and adaptable microorganism. S. marcenscens produces and excretes many proteins and compounds that allow it to adapt to its ever changing environment, including proteases, LPS, hemolysin and many more (Petersen and Tisa, 2013). These diverse compounds and enzymes excreted by S. marcenscens play a crucial role in how S. marcenscens interacts with its numerous different hosts and
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