Sigmund Freud and His Oedipal Complex

832 WordsFeb 17, 20183 Pages
In general, Sigmund Freud and his oedipal complex are among the most often discussed critical theories and argumentative issues found in modern day psychology. Freud’s theory has brought a lot of controversies and has stirred up crazy questions among our close minded and immature society. I mean, why on earth would a child’s desire be to sleep with their mother and kill their father? To us this seems like a rather far-fetched idea and parents can’t try to accept the fact that perhaps their child is out to get them. Back in the day, this idea was totally believable and at one point, universal. Freud believed the Oedipus myth bears witness to the prevalence of this Oedipal Complex, both in that it was a popular topic for Greek tragedy and the fact that modern audiences still relate to the story of Oedipus (who by the way, murdered his father Laius and then married his mother Jocasta). If it happened to the Greeks, why couldn’t it happen to us? The answer is simple. In 2014, we do not believe that we are the play things of gods sitting on clouds. Its common sense. First of all gods can’t possible sit on clouds without falling. Secondly, extra-terrestrial beings aren’t the ones responsible for being the fortune cookies in our lives. Sure, there is the possibility of gods but is it really believable that the fate they have for us will always remain unchangeable? Probably not. And that is the exact notion that led Freud to his mistakes and our criticisms toward him. He viewed
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