Stagecoach Essay

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Stagecoach An Interpretation of 'Stagecoach'

In 1939 John Ford masterminded a classical western film by the name of Stagecoach. This film has the integrity of a fine work of art. Being that it could be considered a work of art, the impression left on a viewing audience could differ relying on the audience's demographics. However, it is conceivable to all audiences that Ford delivers a cast of characters that are built on stereotypes and perceptions conjured from 'B' westerns that preceded this film's time. Each character is introduced to the audience in a stereotypical genre, as the film progresses, these stereotypes are broken down and the characters become more humanized. This is apparent with a handful of characters being
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Her only claim to such an elite profile is her husband, who belongs to the US Calvary. Her iconography is that of upper class women, nothing more really. She longs for her husband, she too is arrogant to some degree, and she is despised of things subordinate to her nature. She is revolted Dallas who is portrayed as a prostitute. She could not even bear to share a meal at the same table with someone of Dallas's social standing. It is only after the birth of her child that she breaks away from her stereotype. She realizes the aid and care that she received from Dallas with her newborn and soon after begins to socially accept Dallas. This is not the last one will see of a character breaking their stereotypical role.

This brings us to the characters that compose the middle class. These characters are: Curly, Hatfield, Doc Boone and Peacock. The roles of these characters are not built and manifested throughout the film. For instance, Curly is introduced as the sheriff out to imprison the Ringo kid. This is in line with the 'B' men of the justice of the peace. His major concern is to see that the laws of the land are upheld. He deviates from this role at the very end of this film by letting the Ringo kid go. Clearly this is an action that is not in line with his law keeping duty. Hatfield, a southern gambler, is really a unique character. Most 'B' western icons depicted as gamblers are usually shown as hard and

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