Surviving Domestic Violence

2284 WordsNov 22, 201310 Pages
An average of 1 in 4 or 25% of women in the United States has experienced physical or sexual abuse throughout an intimate affiliation at some point in time in their life (“Domestic Violence”, 2009). Among these individuals, nearly 2,000 do not make it and die of the resulted injuries they suffer from (“Women against Abuse”, 2012). When it comes to domestic violence, anyone can be a victim; the violence does not discriminate as to who will suffer from it no matter their sex, age, race, ethnicity, or financial background. Behaviors used by one person in a relationship to control the other are what define this dangerous act of crime. Although no one deserves this, it is important to learn of the precautions in order to help someone you love…show more content…
Afraid or anxious to please their partner, the victim may keep quiet concerning their abuse and frequent injuries can be covered up as “accidents.” Because of this, work, school, or social occasions are missed with no explanation. These signs can help save a life that doesn’t deserve to die While abusive behavior and violence is an intentional decision made by the abuser to control the person of choice, it falls into a common pattern or cycle, repeating itself continuously until the individual seeks help or a result of death. Beginning with abuse, aggressive belittling or violent behavior takes place in the relationship giving the abuser automatic control. Once this step is done for the time being, he then feels guilty, not for what he has done, but about the possibility of being caught along with punishment and consequences that comes with it. Within this process, excuses are made blaming their spouse for their abusive behavior and continue to avoid taking responsibility for any of his actions. Next, the abuser does anything possible to regain control and the victim in the relationship, giving him/her hope that there may be an end to their violent behavior. Once the victim agrees to stay, the abuser starts to think of more reasons as to why another argument or fight is necessary. Putting the plan in motion, a situation is created where he can justify the abuse, and the cycle then repeats itself (“Help Guide”, 2013). If someone has a friend, relative, or neighbor
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