The Constitution of the United States

871 Words Jul 13th, 2018 4 Pages
If someone asked you what document most significantly affected America, what would your response be? In early 1787, Daniel Shay led a rebellion in Massachusetts in which the response time to put it down caused a meeting for the complete re-evaluation of the efficiency of the Articles of Confederation. The final result of that meeting was not an amendment of the Articles, but an entirely new draft called the Constitution of the United States. Since then, this document has not only been referred to as the “supreme law”, but as the cornerstone and foundation of the United States government. Time after time in American history, its guidelines and effectiveness have proven that the Constitution is not a document to be disregarded. Therefore, …show more content…
But, the Congress, within each state, has the power to amend the Constitution (Mahler, 1983 and 2000). (See fig. 1.) This exemplifies that the check system in our government helps to maintain a cyclic balance of power – hence the term “checks and balances” – in order to prevent corruption in the political ideology of the nation. Equally important to the nation is the basic and constitutional rights given to each American citizen; though these are better known by a more popularized name: The Bill of Rights. One of the cardinal reasons that settlers came from England to America was to seek the freedom to practice the religion of their choice. The American Revolutionary War was fought for the right of representation and self-determination. Within the following century, the right for all persons to be free was one of the many reasons our Civil War was fought (“The Bill of Rights”). From America’s beginning, its people have always been concerned with the rights they will have. While the wording and order of the first ten amendments may have changed since their original writing (See fig. 2.), their meaning and interpretation will always be the same. And that is to ensure the civil liberties of each and every American citizen. Not only that, but the framers of the Constitution had the utmost intentions to address the needs of a fully unified nation. All
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