The Crucible By Arthur Miller

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Ashley Fletcher English 11 McCloskey 08 March 2017 Salem Has 99 Problems and a Witch Ain 't One Possibly one of the worst feelings is when you are accused of something you have not done. Now, imagine being accused of something so heinous that you are then sentenced to death because of it. This was the reality for many characters in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. The consequences of mass hysteria and corrupting power of authority go head-to-head for prominence in the play. Arthur Miller centralizes the idea of McCarthyism and the events play out as a result. The aspect of mass hysteria in The Crucible occurs because of McCarthyism, which is defined as “a campaign that endorses the use of unfair allegations and investigations”. This is…show more content…
Another leading theme in The Crucible is the corruption of authority’s power. In Salem at this time the Puritan lifestyle ruled the town. It was a highly religious way to live and the church oversaw all activities to keep the town Godly. Reverend Parris is a prime example of the immoral behavior, “He say Mr. Parris must be kill! Mr. Parris no goodly man, Mr. Parris mean man and no gentle man, and he bid me rise out of my bed and cut your throat! (They gasp.) But I tell him "No! I don 't hate that man. I don 't want kill that man." But he say, "You work for me, Tituba, and I make you free! I give you pretty dress to wear, and put you way high up in the air, and you gone fly back to Barbados!" And I say, "You lie, Devil, you lie!" (Act I). This is Reverend Parris’ behavior in a particular occurrence with Tituba as she explained it to the court. Another example of corrupt power is Judge Danforth. In his eyes and the majority of the village’s eyes Danforth is doing what is righteous and is condemning anyone who is not fully with God. Danforth expresses his thoughts on how the trials should be ran and truthfully, I feel like he speaks for the majority of Salem, “You must understand, sir, that a person is either with this court or he must be counted against it, there be no road between. This is a sharp time, now, a precise time—we live no longer in the dusky

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