The Extermination of Jews Living in Germany Essay

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The Holocaust was an organized event to persecute and murder millions Jews by the Nazi regime and its associates. The term Holocaust derives from a Greek word meaning sacrifice by fire. The immediate cause for the event was that the Nazis, who came to power in Germany in 1933, announced that they were racially superior above all races and that the Jews were inferior, and were a threat to the German society. In 1925, there was an individual whose strengths helped determine the outcome of Germany’s future that lead to the Holocaust. Adolf Hitler, who was sent to prison for attempting to overthrow the government, wrote an autobiography called ‘Mein Kempf’ outlining his political ideology and future plans for Germany. As more people began…show more content…
As the Nazi party grew in strength, tyranny had also increased and spread across Europe. The physical environment itself was a factor in the situation, since more pain, injustice, persecution, and massacre were inflicted on millions of other people. They were living in a country where multiculturalism was completely ignored and forbidden. About two to three million Soviet prisoners, for example, were killed, or died of disease and starvation. During the Nazi regime, the government created concentration camps where Jews were beaten, tortured, and murdered. New technological developments such as military weapons, gases, and chambers influenced the situation. In these camps, they were thrown into gas chambers and toxic rooms, where they burned and suffocated. They also monitored the Jewish population by creating ghettos and labor camps during the war. Furthermore, this event can be explained by the strengthened institutions that were under the government’s control. German police squads, for example, murdered more than a million Jews and hundreds of thousands of other people with different norms. Between the years 1941 and 1944, Nazi authorities deported millions of Jews from Germany and from occupied territories, to ghettos and extermination camps, where they were murdered in a dehumanizing matter. As the Holocaust ended, many of the survivors found shelter
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