The Indian Removal Act and Andrew Jackson Essay

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Short Term Essay

The Indian Removal Act, inspired by Andrew Jackson; the 7th president of the US and the enhanced ambition for American settlers to find more land in the southwestern regions of North America. The Indian Removal Act enabled Jackson the power of negotiating removal treaties with Indian tribes east of the Mississippi. Among these tribes were: Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaws and Seminoles. Very few authenticated traits were signed. The Choctaws were the only tribe to agree without any issues. All other attempts resulted in War and blood shed for both white settlers and Indians. The conflict with the U.S. and Indians lasted up until 1837. In 1838 & 1839 Jackson forced the relocation of the remaining Cherokee Indians;
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The battle ended when the Confederates withdrew from Gettysburg on July 4-5th, 1863 because they failed to sustain any break in the main Union line after three days of violent and ferocious attacks.
It was the largest battle of the Civil War totaling around 80,000 deaths, 27,000 men were wounded and more than 16,000 went missing out taken prisoner. On just the 2nd day of the Battle of Gettysburg 3x the amount of American casualties that occurred on D-Day in Normandy. Thousands of more deaths would Galen on the other two days as well. However the casualties favored the Union Army as they withstood a static move by General Lee and clinched victory for the battle.
What was so important about the Battle of Gettysburg was that during the Civil War General Lee attempt to penetrate northern boundaries so he could draw the attention away from the Union defenses. He wanted to manipulate his way around the Yankees so he could have a final battle on s ground of his choosing on Northern territory. Lee's Army as well trained as he believed they were could not outdo the Union Army and their numbers.
The significance of the Battle of Gettysburg was the fact General Lee stepped and failed to invade the Northern theatre in a move designed to take pressure off of Virginia and possibly earn a victory that could win the Civil War. The failure of this strategy meant the South had lost the battle. The kids was demoralizing, Confederates would never again attempt to
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