The Relationship Between Cigarette Smoking And Novel Risk Factors For Cardiovascular Disease

704 WordsNov 17, 20153 Pages
Relationship Between Cigarette Smoking and Novel Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease In The United States In a study of the general population of the United States, over 17,000 individuals were examined on the relationship between cigarette smoking and the levels of homocysteine, fibrinogen, and serum C-reactive protein. Cigarette smoking and cardiovascular disease have been linked and the topic has not been studied much. Cardiovascular disease was the cause of death in 40% of the United States in 1999. Stroke, congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, and peripheral vascular disease can also result from cigarette smoking. In the study, there were “4,187 current smokers, 4,791 former smokers, and 8,375 never-smokers” eighteen or older participating from the years 1988 and 1994. Three thousand people were excluded from the study because their C-reactive proteins had little information. This left 16,596 people in the study for C-reactive proteins. In the analysis for fibrinogen, 2,000 people lacked the information for fibrinogen. Because the participants in the fibrinogen analysis had to be over 40 years of age, 9350 were left for this analysis. Between 1991 and 1994 (phase 2 of the study), homocysteine levels were measured. Close to 1,500 were missing homocysteine values, so 7,458 were examined. The data for the study was collected through home interviews and clinical examinations. Patients had their blood pressure measured six times total (three in the home

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