The Segregation Of The United States

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Throughout history, many laws have been created to keep America as white as possible. Many white people, such as Tim and Mary Anne Walsh, Marianne Bardolino, and Beverly Sowell, believe that America has been taken over by non-white immigrants; and as a result, makes them wonder if this really is a “white country.” Many generations of Americans have been perceived as immigrants, but overcame racism, and are now recognized as “white,” but the new non-white immigrants are treated with the same disdain and disrespect that their fellow white immigrants received throughout history. Webster’s Dictionary defines race as, “any one of the groups that human beings can be divided into based on shared distinctive physical traits.” (Mirriam-Webster) However, ideas about race have been altered over time. There have been many laws passed that limit the number of immigrants allowed in the United States. For example, the Johnson-Reed Immigration Act of 1924 limited the number of immigrants allowed in the U.S. based on a racial census and completely excluded Asian immigrants. Only 2% of the total number of people of each nationality as of the 1890 national census received visas. This led to a divide within immigration because some races were more abundant than others, and as a result, a new racial map was formed. The Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) banned Chinese immigrants from entering the United States. This act also led to a divide within immigration because there were less Chinese
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