The Shack

981 Words 4 Pages
I recently read the book The Shack, the book is based on one man’s experience with God after the horrible and gruesome death of his daughter at the hands of a serial killer. The book tries to answer many questions regarding God and his existence some of the questions being the following: where is God in a world so full of tragedy, and does, he use pain and misfortune to change other people? Mack experiences three different forms of God, The Holy Trinity. They change and shape him into a person who no longer has “the great sadness” in his life, and has a better understanding of God and his own personal relationship with him/her. However not all people may share the experience or faith the way that the author portrays it. Therefore, I have …show more content…
One other problem I find with the Christian religion is Petitionary prayer, if God is all-knowing praying makes no logical sense because he knows what you are going to ask even before you request it, and since he has not done anything for your prayer he is either not benevolent or he can’t help you therefore has limitations. My last criticism of the Christian religion that I understand to be practiced around the world is that it is merely an example of survival of the fittest. Christianity is a fit religion much like a great white or a lion; it gives people a sense of safety and a clarification of what they cannot explain. How many religions have there been previously and failed. Therefore, I would contend that God that happens to be the obsession in all religions is untruthful and non-existent. Mack was not a particularly pious man, not having a strong faith in God nor that his divine work occurred in the world. Mack particularly lost his faith in God after his daughter’s death at the hands of a serial killer. Mack entered a period of great sadness in which he lost connection with his family and became consumed by the ugly monster that is guilt. One day Mack receives a note from God to return to The Shack where they found the tattered dress of his daughter from the horrific day of her abduction and presumed murder. Mack wrestles with the idea that the note he received

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