The Stages Of Critical Thinking

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Section One There are thirteen learning outcomes segmented into three categories of Critical Thinking, Written/Oral Communication and Shared Inquiry, serving as reflective tools to aid in identifying the progress of my learning journey, while participating in Seminar 102: Western Tradition I. Of the thirteen learning outcomes provided, I will describe the progression of my learnings through the lens of Shared Inquiry learning outcome: Pursue new and enriched understandings of the texts through sustained collaborative inquiry. This particular learning outcome fostered both new and enriched understanding of the assigned readings by facilitating engagement through in class and online discussion forums. As I reflect on the process of…show more content…
We try to put everything into boxes, to compartmentalize, justify and label; however, somethings will never be subject to humanity’s logic or reasoning level, like the mystery of God’s handiwork.” This is just one of many examples where engagement with a differing perspective helped me to see things I would have otherwise missed.
Section Two In addition to Shared Inquiry, Seminar involved employing and building strategies of critical thinking, growing in complexity as the course progressed. Of the thirteen learning outcomes, I will describe the progression of my Critical Thinking learning experience through the lens of following learning outcome: Distinguish the multiple senses of a text (literal and beyond the literal). The best way I can distinguish the multiple senses of a given text would be to compare it from both a narrow (concrete) and a broad (generalized) perspective. For example: classmate Kyle Kobza posed the following interpretive question from N. Scott Momaday writing called The Way to Rainy Mountain, “The walls have closed in upon my grandmother’s house. When I returned to in in the morning, I saw for the first time how small it was” (p. 231). “What is meant by this statement and why did her house seem so big until now?” (Kobza). The literal answer I predictably would have responded with prior to Seminar would have related the smallness of the
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