Theme Of Conflict In An Inspector Calls

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How is conflict presented in an inspector calls? Priestley reveals conflict at the heart of the Birling family by shaping up disagreement between them throughout the play. This is evident in ‘but these girls aren’t cheap labor. They’re people.’ Sheila portrays the younger generation’s impressionability. Although she views the workers as people, she refers to them as ‘these girls’ which is still harsh and cold but not as dehumanizing as Mr. Birling’s referral and treatment. The italicized letters of the noun ‘people’ emphasises how different Mr. Birling and Sheila view lower class society. however, Birling completely opposes his daughter in, ‘It has nothing whatever to do with this wretched girls suicide. Eh, Inspector?’ he is quite remorseless…show more content…
Birling, just like his wife, only fears a blow to his reputation. This is conspicuous in ‘So as long as we behave ourselves don’t get into the police court or start a scandal -eh?’ this delineates that the only thing he cares about is how the public views him and his family. The noun “scandal’’ further evidences that Mr. Birling is afraid of any nasty thing about his family being publicized, therefore creating conflict as he displays no other interest than in money. The hyphen suggests that Mr. Birling is trying to befriend the inspector and possibly trying to bribe him into forgetting everything and dropping charges, which was quite common in the 1945. Where capitalists like Birling would assume that everybody has a price and can be persuaded by money. Additionally, birling proves to fiercely believe that money can solve all issues even bring back Eva Smith. This is further evident in '(unhappily) Look, Inspector - I'd give thousands - yes, thousands – ‘. The same man who wouldn’t pay 3 extra shillings to Eva Smith would now pay thousands and thousands to cover this all up. This further conflicts as he goes against his own word. The dramatic irony presents how a man who one wouldn’t pay a little, now has to pay the price. The repetition of ‘thousands’ emphasises how birling strongly believes money can solve everything. The contemporary audience would be enraged and distressed as birling finally gets what he…show more content…
This is evident in “We are responsible for each other.” The inspector implies that everyone is responsible for one another, utterly contradicting Mr. Birling’s speech before he came in. The inspector is the most conflicting character in the entire play as he stands cool and hard before the Birlings and the audience and unveils the consequences of their actions on those below them. The dramatic irony reinforces that the inspector is in fact voicing Priestley’s message out, therefore emphasizing the effect. Furthermore, the inspector is presented as the figure of authority in the play. This is reinforced in "massively taking charge as dispute erupts between them." He is the only character that calms down the household when an argument breaks. He also expresses no interest towards Mr. birling’s authoritative friends and disregards his threats. The stage directions reinforce that when capitalism destroys everything, socialism is the only answer. Both contemporary and modern audience is left in a conflicting situation as he creates conflict in the play between other
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