Thomas Paine 's The Age Of Reason

1666 Words Nov 4th, 2014 7 Pages
In this contemporary era more people do not identify with God and in turn have become more skeptical of God. This shift can be seen in Thomas Paine’s The Age of Reason; which is an excellent example of deism. Paine spares no detail on why he does not believe in the Bible and why he does not believe God is continually working in the world. Jonathan Edwards’ sermon, A Divine and Supernatural Light, on the other hand, adamantly believes in the Bible and that God is actively present in the world. Edwards’s provides an excellent example of Christianity. These two authors create a snapshot of the prevailing, in Edwards’s case, and emerging, in Paine’s case, worldviews of their respective era. Thomas Paine’s The Age of Reason cites contextual reasons for not believing the Bible; while Jonathan Edwards’ sermon, A Divine and Supernatural Light, gives divine reasons for believing the Bible. Thomas Paine’s The Age of Reason, he takes issue with what the Bible calls revelations (aka special revelations). He gives revelations the definition of, when pertaining to religion, as the “something communicated immediately from God to man (510)”. Thus, when a revelation is given from God to man and is then passed on from one person to the next. Paine considers this not to be a true revelation, because he believes a revelation only to that person and to no other. If said revelation were to be applied to others, it would, according to Paine, be hearsay. Because of this Paine believes that the…

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