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When The United States Became A Country In 1776, Slavery

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When the United States became a country in 1776, slavery had already existed on its soils as a legal form of labor for more than a century. It was abolished in 1865 at the end of the American Civil War and with the passing of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. While entire volumes can be written about slavery, this essay will focus on how and why slavery came to be abolished in the United States, and at what cost to the nation and its people.

To begin with , the thirteen colonies had an abundance of different resources from tobacco to cotton. This abundance of resources was perfect for colonial expansion and allowed a crucial source of income that was vital to the nation’s success. Although they had the resources
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The debate was on whether slaves should be counted as citizens or property in order to determine each states financial contribution to the central government. The Nort h argued that slaves should be treated as people. Not because it was right morally, but due to the fact that states were taxed based on population. In other words: money. On the other hand, the South wanted slaves to be counted as people for apportioning representatives for southern whites and to avoid slaves voting for important political movements. Thomas Jefferson was an American Founding Father who was also one of the principal authors of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

However, in spite of his supposed beliefs, Thomas Jefferson himself was a slave owner that had owned more than 100 slaves. Slaves accounted for about one-fifth of the population in the American colonies and most of them lived in the Southern colonies, where slaves made up 40 percent of the population. Many colonists have even admitted to hating slavery. Now you may be asking yourself how someone could be a slave owner and despise slavery. Well, southern colonists relied on slavery and were among the richest in America. Their cash crops of tobacco, indigo, and rice depended on slave labor, which they were not willing to give up.

A dispute
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