preview

Why Is Sherburn Important In Huck Finn

Decent Essays

The ideal that emerges from Sherburn is an honorable Southerner, in contrast to the typical slave-holding Southern man. Defying the norm, Sherburn stands up to the crowd in his speech to the people of Bricksville. Instead of following the crowd, he brings out the cowardice of men on page 162: “I was born and raised in the south, and I’ve lived in the north; so I know the average all around.” Similar to Twain himself, Sherburn knows the true nature of both northerners and southerners: cowardice. Sherburn explains that nobody is willing to have courage and stand up to evil. Responding to Sherburn’s courage, Huck takes action later on in the novel. Instead of being a coward when he has the chance to free Jim, Huck takes action and stands up to

Get Access
Get Access