William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet

1263 WordsFeb 23, 20176 Pages
Shakespeare is known for numerous literature achievements such as Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, MacBeth and so on. However, he is also known for his short but witty sonnets. While Shakespeare was known for more romantic stylistic poems and plays, his sonnets attack conventional notions in a number of ways. Shakespeare takes the ideas and attitudes of other sonnets and twists them into his own which goes against the habitual descriptions. Two sonnets, in particular, "Sonnet 130" and also "Sonnet 138", are examples of how he mocks and attacks the conventions of relationships, women 's beauty and also the conventionality of love in poetry itself. The conventional notions of beauty were expressed all throughout poetry during the Shakespearian…show more content…
The last contradicting comparison that portrays women 's beauty can be drawn out by the lines in Shakespeare 's sonnet involving his mistresses ' cheeks: " I have seen roses damask 'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks." This line is in direct contraction to Griffin 's fair lady: "Her cheeks, red roses, such as seld have been" (sonnet39). This is practically a word for word mockery of Griffin 's sonnet about his women 's flesh. Shakespeare takes the idea of the rose as a simile to the cheek and morphs his to telling of that his mistress ' cheeks have not the reddest color of rose in them resulting in a pale bleak face. The women who Shakespeare describes would never be sought upon or wished to be drawn out for readers because of the fact that it was not the conventional standards of poems describing beauty. Shakespeare takes the most common descriptions a sonnet gives and twists them into something that wouldn 't be considered predictable and or accepted. The differing factors of this comparison is the fact that Shakespeare 's objective in describing his fair lady was to completely go against the conventionality of describing a women 's beauty in a poem. Along with the conventionality notions of beauty within poetry, Shakespeare also attacks relationships. A basic definition of a relationship is described as "a profoundly tender, passionate
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