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Women's Rights And Abigail Adams Fight For Equality

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Women’s rights and equalities have always been an issue. Women first began their fight for equality in 1776, when the Congress was working on the Declaration of Independence. During the late 1840s, women set up the first women’s rights convention, which was the starting point of the women’s rights movement. In 1861, men were getting called off to war, leaving their wives and kids at home to wait patiently and care for the house and children. Women did not take too well to that idea, and they began to take action. Women have always fought for their right to stand alongside men. The three major events for the fight to gain rights and equality for women were the “Remembering the Ladies” declaration, the Civil War, and the Women’s Rights Movement.…show more content…
Abigail Adams’ letter stated, “I long to hear that you have declared an independency. And, by the way, in the new code of laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I desire you would remember the ladies and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the husbands. Remember, all men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.” Abigail tells John that women will not stand for the maltreatment in a new republic, she then explains that men should not be given any authority that can be used against women, and society should treat women as equals. John not only disagree with Abigail’s letter, but also wrote back saying, “…we know better than to repeal our Masculine…show more content…
During this convention, men and women signed a Declaration of Sentiments, which demanded that women be equal with men before the law, employment, and education. This was also the first proclamation demanding to give women the ability to vote. In 1869, two women’s suffrage associations were formed with the goal to gain voting rights for women nationally and statewide. In December of that year, Wyoming territory passed the first women’s suffrage law that allowed women to serve on juries in that territory. The two associations then merged together and formed the National American Woman Suffrage Association in 1890. Colorado became the first state to grant women the right to vote in 1893. Utah and Idaho follow in 1896, Washington State in 1910, California in 1911, Oregon, Kansas, and Arizona in 1912, Alaska and Illinois in 1913, Montana and Nevada in 1914, New York in 1917, Michigan, South Dakota, and Oklahoma in 1918. In 1903, the National Women's Trade Union League was established to support improved wages and working conditions for women. The Women's Bureau of the Department of Labor was formed in 1920 to collect information about women in the workforce and secure good working conditions. The 19th Amendment was established, granting women everywhere the right vote. On June 10th of 1963, Congress passed the Equal Pay Act, which made it
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