Woodrow Wilson 's Vision For A League Of Nations

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Woodrow Wilson sought out the future of America, as he understood that the liberty that underlined democracy was starting to look vulnerable in the current world 's state. It was at the address at Independence Hall, that Wilson defined the position of liberty and its place in the world when he said; “ I earnestly believe in the democracy not only of America but of every awakened people that wishes and intends to govern and control its own affairs. “ His perspective of the ownership of liberty would shaped how he would help foreign nations. Through the proposal of the 14 point speech on new methods to dispute in worldwide affairs peacefully, and the immediate rejection by the senate, his legacy was brought in the creation of foreign…show more content…
The United States served as the middleman in the war, America didn’t join for the gain of land, but as outlined in his famous fourteen point speech, article XIV, for ; A general association of nations must be formed under specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual guarantees of political independence and territorial integrity to great and small states alike.” This speech was to outline the the principles for world peace that was to be used for peace negotiations. With no United Nations, or variants of. Wilson set out for the creation of what he would call, “ The League of Nations.” The league of Nations presented a great challenge, a general association of nations from both sides of the atlantic who believed there needed to be a better organization of communication that promotes international support. Previously The United States congress would serve as an international structure to hold summits in which European powers would come to discuss what they thought would be urgent. The impact of the United States in global politics is underlined as; “proof of the failure of traditional European diplomacy, based on balances of power, armed alliances and
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