Chaptertextbookof derivatives; this problem set focuses on material from4ot ourdiscussesapplicationssections 4.4, 4.6, and 4.7. We discussed the section 4.4 (the Mean Value Theorem) in class on March 29, andthe remaining material between April 5 and 12.ActivitySolve the following problems:Question 1. (Based on OpenStax Calculus, Volume 1, section 4.4, exercise 190)Part A. At 10:17 a.m., you are traveling 55 mph when you pass a police car that is stopped on thefreeway. You pass a second stopped police car at 10:53 a.m., when you are also traveling 55mph. The second police car is located 39 miles from the first one. If the speed limit is 60 mph,can the police cite you for speeding? Why or why not?Part B. After being cited for speeding in Part A, you appeal the ticket on the grounds that your car isthe new model with the high tech teleporter drive, which allows the car to move instantaneouslyfrom one place to another. Assuming the car really does have such a device, should the courtdismiss your ticket? Why or why not?

Question
Asked Apr 16, 2019
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how do you solve part a?

Chapter
textbook
of derivatives; this problem set focuses on material from
4
ot our
discusses
applications
sections 4.4, 4.6, and 4.7. We discussed the section 4.4 (the Mean Value Theorem) in class on March 29, and
the remaining material between April 5 and 12.
Activity
Solve the following problems:
Question 1. (Based on OpenStax Calculus, Volume 1, section 4.4, exercise 190)
Part A. At 10:17 a.m., you are traveling 55 mph when you pass a police car that is stopped on the
freeway. You pass a second stopped police car at 10:53 a.m., when you are also traveling 55
mph. The second police car is located 39 miles from the first one. If the speed limit is 60 mph,
can the police cite you for speeding? Why or why not?
Part B. After being cited for speeding in Part A, you appeal the ticket on the grounds that your car is
the new model with the high tech teleporter drive, which allows the car to move instantaneously
from one place to another. Assuming the car really does have such a device, should the court
dismiss your ticket? Why or why not?
help_outline

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Chapter textbook of derivatives; this problem set focuses on material from 4 ot our discusses applications sections 4.4, 4.6, and 4.7. We discussed the section 4.4 (the Mean Value Theorem) in class on March 29, and the remaining material between April 5 and 12. Activity Solve the following problems: Question 1. (Based on OpenStax Calculus, Volume 1, section 4.4, exercise 190) Part A. At 10:17 a.m., you are traveling 55 mph when you pass a police car that is stopped on the freeway. You pass a second stopped police car at 10:53 a.m., when you are also traveling 55 mph. The second police car is located 39 miles from the first one. If the speed limit is 60 mph, can the police cite you for speeding? Why or why not? Part B. After being cited for speeding in Part A, you appeal the ticket on the grounds that your car is the new model with the high tech teleporter drive, which allows the car to move instantaneously from one place to another. Assuming the car really does have such a device, should the court dismiss your ticket? Why or why not?

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Expert Answer

Step 1

Given:

The distance betwee two police cars = 39 miles

The time when crossing the first police car = 10:17 am

The time when crossing the second police car = 10:53 am

The speed limit is 60 mph.

Step 2

The time interval between crossingthe two police cars

                                 = Time while crossing the secon car - Time while crossing the first car

                                 = 10:53 - 10:17

                                 = 36 minutes

                                 = (36/60) hours

                                 =  0.6 hours

Step 3

Average Speed = Distance / Time

                                  = 39 miles ...

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