SECTION 3.1 Events, Sample Spaces, and Probability 131 ified according to de- -moderate, moderate, a. In how many possible ways can the three-grill displays be selected from the 5 displays? List the possibilities. measurements b. The next table shows the grill display combinations and number of each selected by the 124 students. Use this information to assign reasonable probabilities to the are re- One tooth is randomly is the probability that mount of wear? different display combinations. c. Find the probability that a student who participated in the study selected a display combination involving Grill #1. light ight Grill Display Combination Number of Students 35 42 eavy nworn 1-2-3 1-2-4 1-2-5 2-3-4 2-3-5 2-4-5 ght-moderate ght-moderate oderate 4 worn known 34 question posed in a meteorologist rnoon is .4," does time during the Based on Hamilton, R. W."Why do people suggest what they do not want? Using context effects to influence others' choices." Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 29, Mar. 2003, Table 1. n he the Journal of 13) investigation y station with 11 gorithm designed is one in which tracks to a train 3.30 ESL students and plagiarism. The Journal of Education and Human Development (Vol. 3, 2009) investigated the causes of plagiarism among six English-as-a-second- language (ESL) students. All students in the class wrote two essays, one in the middle and one at the end of the semester. After the first essay, the students were in- structed on how to avoid plagiarism in the second essay. Of the six ESL students, three admitted to plagiarizing on the first essay. Only one ESL student admitted to plagia- rizing on the second essay. (This student, who also plagia- rized on the first essav, claimed she misplaced her notes s is assigned to an

Glencoe Algebra 1, Student Edition, 9780079039897, 0079039898, 2018
18th Edition
ISBN:9780079039897
Author:Carter
Publisher:Carter
Chapter10: Statistics
Section10.6: Summarizing Categorical Data
Problem 10CYU
icon
Related questions
icon
Concept explainers
Topic Video
Question

Refer to the study below of how people attempt to influence the choices of others. Recall that students selected three portable grill displays to be compared from an offering of five different grill displays.
a). Use a counting rule to count the number of ways the three displays can be selected from the five available displays to form a three grill display combination.
b). The researchers informed students to select the three displays in order to convince people to choose Grill #2. Consequently, Grill #2 was a required selection. Use a counting rule to count the number of different ways the three grill displays can be selected from the five displays if grill #2 is selected. (The answer should agree with the answer of a)
c). Now suppose the three selected grills will be set up in a specific order for viewing by a customer. (The customer views one grill first, then the second, and finally the third grill). Again, grill #2 must be one of the three selected. How many different ways can the three grill displays be selected if customers view the grills in order?

SECTION 3.1 Events, Sample Spaces, and Probability 131
ified according to de-
-moderate, moderate,
a. In how many possible ways can the three-grill displays
be selected from the 5 displays? List the possibilities.
measurements
b. The next table shows the grill display combinations and
number of each selected by the 124 students. Use this
information to assign reasonable probabilities to the
are re-
One tooth is randomly
is the probability that
mount of wear?
different display combinations.
c. Find the probability that a student who participated
in the study selected a display combination involving
Grill #1.
light
ight
Grill Display Combination
Number of Students
35
42
eavy
nworn
1-2-3
1-2-4
1-2-5
2-3-4
2-3-5
2-4-5
ght-moderate
ght-moderate
oderate
4
worn
known
34
question posed in
a meteorologist
rnoon is .4," does
time during the
Based on Hamilton, R. W."Why do people suggest what they do not
want? Using context effects to influence others' choices." Journal of
Consumer Research, Vol. 29, Mar. 2003, Table 1.
n
he
the Journal of
13) investigation
y station with 11
gorithm designed
is one in which
tracks to a train
3.30 ESL students and plagiarism. The Journal of Education
and Human Development (Vol. 3, 2009) investigated
the causes of plagiarism among six English-as-a-second-
language (ESL) students. All students in the class wrote
two essays, one in the middle and one at the end of the
semester. After the first essay, the students were in-
structed on how to avoid plagiarism in the second essay.
Of the six ESL students, three admitted to plagiarizing on
the first essay. Only one ESL student admitted to plagia-
rizing on the second essay. (This student, who also plagia-
rized on the first essav, claimed she misplaced her notes
s
is assigned to an
Transcribed Image Text:SECTION 3.1 Events, Sample Spaces, and Probability 131 ified according to de- -moderate, moderate, a. In how many possible ways can the three-grill displays be selected from the 5 displays? List the possibilities. measurements b. The next table shows the grill display combinations and number of each selected by the 124 students. Use this information to assign reasonable probabilities to the are re- One tooth is randomly is the probability that mount of wear? different display combinations. c. Find the probability that a student who participated in the study selected a display combination involving Grill #1. light ight Grill Display Combination Number of Students 35 42 eavy nworn 1-2-3 1-2-4 1-2-5 2-3-4 2-3-5 2-4-5 ght-moderate ght-moderate oderate 4 worn known 34 question posed in a meteorologist rnoon is .4," does time during the Based on Hamilton, R. W."Why do people suggest what they do not want? Using context effects to influence others' choices." Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 29, Mar. 2003, Table 1. n he the Journal of 13) investigation y station with 11 gorithm designed is one in which tracks to a train 3.30 ESL students and plagiarism. The Journal of Education and Human Development (Vol. 3, 2009) investigated the causes of plagiarism among six English-as-a-second- language (ESL) students. All students in the class wrote two essays, one in the middle and one at the end of the semester. After the first essay, the students were in- structed on how to avoid plagiarism in the second essay. Of the six ESL students, three admitted to plagiarizing on the first essay. Only one ESL student admitted to plagia- rizing on the second essay. (This student, who also plagia- rized on the first essav, claimed she misplaced her notes s is assigned to an
Expert Solution
trending now

Trending now

This is a popular solution!

steps

Step by step

Solved in 4 steps with 3 images

Blurred answer
Knowledge Booster
Sample space, Events, and Basic Rules of Probability
Learn more about
Need a deep-dive on the concept behind this application? Look no further. Learn more about this topic, statistics and related others by exploring similar questions and additional content below.
Recommended textbooks for you
Glencoe Algebra 1, Student Edition, 9780079039897…
Glencoe Algebra 1, Student Edition, 9780079039897…
Algebra
ISBN:
9780079039897
Author:
Carter
Publisher:
McGraw Hill
College Algebra
College Algebra
Algebra
ISBN:
9781337282291
Author:
Ron Larson
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Holt Mcdougal Larson Pre-algebra: Student Edition…
Holt Mcdougal Larson Pre-algebra: Student Edition…
Algebra
ISBN:
9780547587776
Author:
HOLT MCDOUGAL
Publisher:
HOLT MCDOUGAL
Calculus For The Life Sciences
Calculus For The Life Sciences
Calculus
ISBN:
9780321964038
Author:
GREENWELL, Raymond N., RITCHEY, Nathan P., Lial, Margaret L.
Publisher:
Pearson Addison Wesley,
College Algebra
College Algebra
Algebra
ISBN:
9781938168383
Author:
Jay Abramson
Publisher:
OpenStax
College Algebra (MindTap Course List)
College Algebra (MindTap Course List)
Algebra
ISBN:
9781305652231
Author:
R. David Gustafson, Jeff Hughes
Publisher:
Cengage Learning