The Basic Practice of Statistics - 8th Edition - by David S. Moore, William I. Notz, Michael A. Fligner - ISBN 9781319042578
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The Basic Practice of Statistics
8th Edition
David S. Moore, William I. Notz, Michael A. Fligner
Publisher: W. H. Freeman
ISBN: 9781319042578

Solutions for The Basic Practice of Statistics

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Chapter 2.3 - Comparing The Mean And The MedianChapter 2.5 - The Five-number Summary And BoxplotsChapter 2.6 - Spotting Suspected Outliers And Modified BoxplotsChapter 2.8 - Choosing Measures Of Center And VariabilityChapter 2.10 - Organizing A Statistical ProblemChapter 3 - The Normal DistributionsChapter 3.1 - Density CurvesChapter 3.2 - Describing Density CurvesChapter 3.4 - The 68-95-99.7 RuleChapter 3.5 - The Standard Normal DistributionChapter 3.7 - Using The Standard Normal TableChapter 3.8 - Finding A Value Given A ProportionChapter 4 - Scatterplots And CorrelationChapter 4.1 - Explanatory And Respone VariablesChapter 4.2 - Displaying Relationships: ScatterplotsChapter 4.3 - Interpreting ScatterplotsChapter 4.4 - Adding Categorical Variables To ScatterplotsChapter 4.5 - Measuring Linear Association: CorrelationChapter 4.6 - Facts About CorrelationChapter 5 - RegressionChapter 5.1 - Regression LinesChapter 5.3 - Examples Of TechnologyChapter 5.4 - Facts About Least-squares RegressionChapter 5.5 - ResidualsChapter 5.6 - Influential ObservationsChapter 5.7 - Cautions About Correlation And RegressionChapter 5.8 - Association Does Not Imply CausationChapter 6 - Two-way TablesChapter 6.1 - Marginal DistributionsChapter 6.2 - Conditional DistributionsChapter 6.3 - Simpson's ParadoxChapter 7 - Exploring Data: Part I ReviewChapter 8 - Producing Data: SamplingChapter 8.1 - Population Versus SampleChapter 8.2 - How To Sample BadlyChapter 8.3 - Simple Random SamplesChapter 8.4 - Inference About The PopulationChapter 8.5 - Other Sampling DesignsChapter 8.6 - Cautions About Sample SurveysChapter 8.7 - The Impact Of TechnologyChapter 9 - Producing Data: ExperimentsChapter 9.1 - Observation Versus ExperimentChapter 9.2 - Subjects, Factors, And TreatmentsChapter 9.3 - How To Experiment BadlyChapter 9.4 - Randomized Comparative ExperimentsChapter 9.5 - The Logic Of Randomized Comparative ExperimentsChapter 9.6 - Cautions About ExperimentationChapter 9.7 - Matched Pairs And Other Block DesignsChapter 10 - Data Ethics*Chapter 10.1 - Institutional Review BoardsChapter 10.2 - Infored ConsentChapter 10.3 - ConfidentialityChapter 11 - Producing Data: Part Ii ReviewChapter 12 - Introducing ProbabilityChapter 12.2 - The Search For RandomnessChapter 12.3 - Probability ModelsChapter 12.4 - Probability RulesChapter 12.5 - Finite Probability ModelsChapter 12.6 - Continuous Probability ModelsChapter 12.7 - Random VariablesChapter 12.8 - Personal ProbabilityChapter 13 - General Rules Of ProbabilityChapter 13.1 - The General Addition RuleChapter 13.2 - Independence And The Multiplication RuleChapter 13.3 - Conditional ProbabilityChapter 13.4 - The General Multiplication RuleChapter 13.5 - Showing Events Are IndependentChapter 13.6 - Tree DiagramsChapter 13.7 - Bayes' RuleChapter 14 - Binomial DistributionsChapter 14.2 - Binomial Distributions In Statistical SamplingChapter 14.4 - Examples Of TechnologyChapter 14.5 - Binomial Mean And Standard DeviationChapter 14.6 - The Normal Approximation To Binomial DistributionsChapter 15 - Sampling DistributionsChapter 15.1 - Parameters And StatisticsChapter 15.2 - Statisitcal Estimation And The Law Of Large NumbersChapter 15.3 - Sampling DistributionsChapter 15.4 - The Sampling Distribution Of X-barChapter 15.5 - The Central Limit TheoremChapter 15.6 - Sampling Distributions And Statistical SignificanceChapter 16 - Confidence Intervals: The BasicsChapter 16.1 - The Reasoning Of Statistical EstimationChapter 16.2 - Margin Of Error And Confidence LevelChapter 16.3 - Confidence Lntervals For A Population MeanChapter 16.4 - How Confidence Intervals BehaveChapter 17 - Tests Of Significance: The BasicsChapter 17.1 - The Reasoning Of Tests Of SignificanceChapter 17.2 - Stating HypothesesChapter 17.3 - P-value And Statistical SignificanceChapter 17.4 - Tests For A Population MeanChapter 17.5 - Significance From A TableChapter 18 - Inference In PracticeChapter 18.1 - Conditions For Inference In PracticeChapter 18.2 - Cautions About Confidence LntervalsChapter 18.3 - Cautions About Significance TestsChapter 18.4 - Planning Studies: Sample Size For Confidence LntervalsChapter 18.5 - Planning Studies: The Power Of A Statistical Test Of SignificanceChapter 19 - From Data Production To Inference: Part Iii ReviewChapter 20 - Inference About A Population MeanChapter 20.1 - Conditions For Inference About A MeanChapter 20.2 - The T DistributionsChapter 20.3 - The One Sample T Confidence IntervalChapter 20.4 - The One-sample T TestChapter 20.6 - Matched Pairs T ProceduresChapter 20.7 - Robustness Of T ProceduresChapter 21 - Comparing Two MeansChapter 21.1 - Two-sample Problems P HatChapter 21.3 - Two-sample T ProceduresChapter 21.4 - Examples Of TechnologyChapter 21.5 - Robustness AgainChapter 21.6 - Details Of The T ApproximationChapter 22 - Inference About A Population ProportionChapter 22.1 - The Sample Proportion P HatChapter 22.2 - Large-sample Confidence Intervals For A ProportionChapter 22.3 - Choosing The Sample SizeChapter 22.4 - Significance Tests For A ProportionChapter 22.5 - Plus Four Confidence Intervals For A ProportionChapter 23 - Comparing Two ProportionsChapter 23.4 - Examples Of TechnologyChapter 23.5 - Significance Tests For Compariog ProportionsChapter 23.6 - Plus Four Confidence Lntervals For Comparing ProportionsChapter 24 - Inference About Variables: Part Iv ReviewChapter 25 - Two Categorical Variables: The Chi Square TestChapter 25.1 - Two-way TablesChapter 25.2 - The Problem Of Multiple ComparisonsChapter 25.3 - Expected Counts In Two-way TablesChapter 25.5 - Examples Of TechnolologyChapter 25.6 - The Chi-square DistributionsChapter 25.7 - Cell Counts Required For The Chi-square TestChapter 25.8 - Uses Of The Chi-square Test: Independence And HomogeneityChapter 25.9 - The Chi-square Test For Goodness Of FitChapter 26 - Inference For RegressionChapter 26.2 - Estimating The ParametersChapter 26.3 - Examples Of TechnologyChapter 26.4 - Testing The Hypothesis Of No Linear RelationshipChapter 26.5 - Testing Lack Of CorrelationChapter 26.6 - Confidence Intervals For The Regression SlopeChapter 26.7 - Inference About PredictionChapter 26.8 - Checking The Conditions For InferenceChapter 27 - One Way Analysis Of Variance: Comparing Several MeansChapter 27.2 - The Analysis Of Variance F TestChapter 27.3 - Examples Of TechnologyChapter 27.4 - The Idea Of Analysis Of VarianceChapter 27.5 - Conditions For AnovaChapter 27.6 - F Distributions And Degrees Of FreedomChapter 27.7 - Follow-up Analysis: Tukey Pairwise Multiple ComparisonsChapter 27.8 - Some Details Of AnovaChapter 28 - Nonparametric TestsChapter 28.1 - Comparing Two Samples: The Wilcoxon Rank Sum TestChapter 28.2 - The Normal Approximation For WChapter 28.3 - Examples Of TechnologyChapter 28.4 - What Hypotheses Does Wilcoxon Test?Chapter 28.5 - Dealing With Ties In Rank TestsChapter 28.6 - Matched Pairs: The Wilcoxon Signed Rank TestChapter 28.7 - The Normal Approximation For W+Chapter 28.8 - Dealing With Ties In The Signed Rank TestChapter 28.11 - The Kruskal-wallis Test StatisticChapter 29 - Multiple RegressionChapter 29.1 - Adding A Categorical Variables In RegressionChapter 29.2 - Estimating ParametersChapter 29.3 - Examples Of TechnoogyChapter 29.4 - Inference For Multiple RegressionChapter 29.6 - A Model With Two Regression LinesChapter 29.7 - The General Multiplication Linear Regression ModeChapter 29.8 - The Woes Of Regression CoefficientsChapter 29.9 - A Case Study For Multiple RegressionChapter 29.10 - Inference For Regression ParametersChapter 29.11 - Checking The Conditions For InferenceChapter 30 - Two-way Analysis Of VarianceChapter 30.1 - Beyond One-way AnovaChapter 30.2 - Two-way Anova: Conditions, Main Effects, And InteractionChapter 31 - Statistical Process ControlChapter 31.2 - Describing ProcessesChapter 31.4 - X Bar Charts For Process MonitoringChapter 31.5 - S Charts For Process MonitoringChapter 31.7 - Setting Up Contro ChartsChapter 31.8 - Comments On Statistical ControlChapter 31.9 - Don't Confuse Control With CapabilityChapter 31.11 - Control Limits For P ChartsChapter 32 - Resampling: Permutation Tests And The BootstrapChapter 32.1 - Randomization In Experiments As A Basis For InferenceChapter 32.3 - Generating Bootstrap Samples

Book Details

A defining statistics education, The Basic Practice of Statistics puts data analysis at the forefront and begins to develop students' reasoning and judgment about statistical studies.

Written by an author team of accomplished leaders in statistics education, The Basic Practice of Statistics (BPS) reflects the actual practice of statistics, where data analysis and design of data production join with probability-based inference to form a coherent science of data. The authors' ultimate goal is to equip students to carry out common statistical procedures and to follow statistical reasoning in their fields of study and in their future employment.

The text's long-standing renown is built on an inspired framework of balanced content, experience with data, and the importance of ideas. These themes are widely accepted by statisticians concerned about teaching and are directly connected to and reflected by the themes of the College Report of the Guidelines in Assessment and Instruction for Statistics Education (GAISE) Project.

The eighth edition of The Basic Practice of Statistics is supported in SaplingPLUS for a user experience of its own. SaplingPLUS combines Macmillan's StatsTools, powerful multimedia resources, and text-specific exercises with the powerful targeted feedback of Sapling Learning, where every problem is a teaching and learning opportunity.

Sample Solutions for this Textbook

We offer sample solutions for The Basic Practice of Statistics homework problems. See examples below:

Reason for the correct answer: The study is about ‘victimization during adolescence has an impact on...Given info: The institutional review boards of government regulations should consist of at least...Explanation: Reason for the correct answer: Here, the subjects are imposed by certain experimental...Reason for Correct answer: In a long run, of a large number of hands in a five-cards, the...Explanation: Reason for the correct option: It is given that the probability of winning any one play...Explanation: Reason for the correct answer: The random variable x represents the number of...Given info: The data shows that the percentage of people interviewed were employed is 4.9% and the...Reason for the correct answer: For 99.9% confidence level, 1−C2=1−0.9992=0.0012=0.0005 Software...Reason for the correct answer: In the given problem, the P-value is 0.011. From the definition of...Reason for correct answer: The important condition for statistical inference is data is collected...Explanation: Given info: The study deals with the exercise and fitness. The participants are either...Reason for the correct option: Prefer the t procedures to the z procedures for inference about a...Reason for the correct answer: Here, only one independent random sample of 12th-graders in the...Reason for the correct option: The population is defined as the collection of all individuals,...Reason for the correct answer: In the given situation, there is evidence that the proportion of 12th...Reason for the correct option: Software procedure: Step by step procedure to obtain the confidence...Reason for correct answer: The survey results for the two questions “Would you say your health is...Reason for the correct answer: From the given MINITAB output, the value of the slope (b) is 1.2186,...Reason for the correct option: One-way ANOVA is used to compare more than two groups of means or...Reason for the correct answer: Here, the blood pressure of eight high-capacity and eight...Reason for correct answer: The problem deals with the treadmill display showing the calories per...Explanation: Reason for the correct option: Two-way ANOVA compares the combinations of factor C and...Reason for the correct answer: Here, the mean response distance is plotted on an x¯ control chart...Reason for the correct answer: The sampling distributions are applicable without the assumptions of...

More Editions of This Book

Corresponding editions of this textbook are also available below:

The Basic Practice of Statistics
6th Edition
ISBN: 9781464102547
The Basic Practice of Statistics
5th Edition
ISBN: 9781429224260
BASIC PRACTICE OF STATISTICS+LAUNCHPAD
8th Edition
ISBN: 9781319053093
BASIC PRAC OF STATISTICS+LAUNCHPAD+REE
8th Edition
ISBN: 9781319123680
BASIC PRACTICE OF STATS-LL W/SAPLINGPLU
8th Edition
ISBN: 9781319216245
BASIC PRACTICE OF STATISTICS >C<
8th Edition
ISBN: 9781319220280
BASIC PRACTICE OF STATISTICS(REISSUE)>C
8th Edition
ISBN: 9781319341831
Basic Practice of Statistics (Instructor's)
8th Edition
ISBN: 9781319057923
The Basic Practice of Statistics
8th Edition
ISBN: 9781319057916
The Basic Practice of Statistics
7th Edition
ISBN: 9781464142536
Loose-leaf Version for The Basic Practice of Statistics 7e & LaunchPad (Twelve Month Access)
7th Edition
ISBN: 9781319019334

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