BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300

Solutions

Chapter
Section
BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300
Textbook Problem

Spitting cobras can defend themselves by squeezing muscles around their venom glands to squirt venom at an attacker. Suppose a spitting cobra rears up to a height of 0.500 m above the ground and launches venom at 3.50 m/s, directed 50.0° above the horizon. Neglecting air resistance, find the horizontal distance traveled by the venom before it hits the ground.

To determine
The horizontal distance travelled by the venom before it hits the ground.

Explanation

The components of the initial velocity of the venom when v0=3.50m/s and θ=50.0° are,

v0x=v0cosθ

Here,

v0 is the initial velocity

θ is the angle of projection

v0x=(3.50m/s)cos50.0°=2.25m/s

v0y=v0sinθ=(3.50m/s)sin50.0°=2.68m/s

The final velocity of the venom before hitting the ground is negative and is given by

vy=voy22gΔy

Here,

vy is the vertical velocity

v0y is the vertical component of the initial velocity

g is the acceleration due to gravity

Δy is the vertical displacement

Substitute 2.68m/s for v0y , 0.500m for Δy and 9.80m/s2 for g .

vy=(2

Still sussing out bartleby?

Check out a sample textbook solution.

See a sample solution

The Solution to Your Study Problems

Bartleby provides explanations to thousands of textbook problems written by our experts, many with advanced degrees!

Get Started

Additional Science Solutions

Find more solutions based on key concepts

Show solutions add

Water-soluble vitamins are mostly absorbed into the lymph. the blood. the extracellular fluid, b and c.

Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies - Standalone book (MindTap Course List)

Why does the orbital period of a binary star depend on its mass?

Horizons: Exploring the Universe (MindTap Course List)

Review. A molecule of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is 2.17m long. The ends of the molecule become singly ionized...

Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Technology Update (No access codes included)