Easter Island Essay

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    Easter Island Effect

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    Easter Island What happened to Easter Island? Oliver Kirby - 14 November 2017 Easter Island My name is Oliver Kirby and I am a historian. For many years now I have been deeply invested in the study of South American and Polynesian history. The magazine ‘The Good Weekend’ approached me with an opportunity to write an article discussing the rise and expansion of Easter Island and then its decline. I will also be discussing if what happened to Easter Island is a microcosm of what might happen to

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    Conducting my research supporting a vacation on Easter Island, an atypical destination filled with mystery and intrigue, I realized this destination is a must, not only for the adventure, but also for the opportunity to experience a place not everyone is willing to expend the time and expense involved in visiting, a vacation is ultimately a chance to escape the everyday drudgery and routine, all these reasons make Easter Island the perfect, eclectic, vacation spot to enjoy a once in a lifetime

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    A Study On Easter Island

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    Easter Island has long been a puzzling intrigue in the minds of historians, scholars, and the common folk alike. What happened to the once tropical lush forests? How did a civilization erect such impressive statues and why were they erected? And where are the people who erected these statues now? Many of these questions have been explained over the years with circumstantial evidence and preposterous assumptions. However, through careful analysis and meticulous evidence gathering, lead scholars like

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    “In Easter Island...the shadows of the departed builders still possess the land...the whole air vibrates with a vast purpose and energy which has been and is no more. What was it? Why was it?" said Katherine Routledge, an explorer and archaeologist. People across the globe have marveled at the wonders of Easter Island for centuries. The remains of the island are huge statues called moai, which seemed to be an impossible feat for people of the time. Archaeologists everywhere are gathering together

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    Essay On Easter Island

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    Polynesian Expansion Easter Island, previously named Rapa Nui, is mostly famous for its 10 metre tall Moai statues dotting the Island. Easter Island is located on the eastern point of the Polynesian Triangle. Easter Island has four extinct volcanoes, but its largest is Rano Kau, located on the southwestern headland. Rapa Nui was first settled by Hotu Matu’a in 400 CE. He came from the Marquesas in two large canoes with his wife and extended family. The Polynesians navigated Rapa Nui, using only

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    Easter Island Theory

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    The articles by Keegan and Diamond describe the mystery of Easter Island and how the society and people disappeared. Easter Island located off the coast of Chile in South America. The theory that best explains both articles are cultural theory. The cultural theory is the tradition and norms in society affects the way you make decisions (Lim, 2016). Cultural theory traps people to think a specific way, which is called the webs of significance. Culture must be learned and constantly reproduced. Culture

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    The Easter Island heads. Rapa Nui has been a place of mystery since it was discovered in 1772. The name “Easter Island” is the European name given by Jacob Roggeveen. The mystery on Easter Island is the moai, otherwise known as the heads of Easter Island. How the moai got there is still in debate but there have been multiple proven theories of how they got there. The three main theories I will discuss are the rope theory, the wooden sledge theory and the walking theory. The rope theory is one of

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    Stonehenge vs. Easter Island Stonehenge and Easter Island are two very old and interesting mysteries and monuments of the world. Stonehenge is outside of Salisbury, England and is consists of lots of grass and giant, grey stones. This site was made between the times of 1520 B.C.E- 3000 B.C.E. There are many reasons why people think Stonehenge was built. Stonehenge was built it using precise stages of construction. Archaeologists said it could have been used for rituals, traditions or even used as

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    Easter Island has a unique history that outlines key theories of how man can have detrimental effects on nature. With our beliefs, customs and general life needs, societies become dependent on our environment and resources. This can result in an irreversible destruction of an environment and Easter Island has proven this to be posable. With a society becoming hugely dependant on the limited resources available and failure to understand the need to preserve these resources for future generations caused

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    ancient, massive statue called a moai has moved from the quarries to its ahu has many people questioning, how did the ancient natives of Easter Island do it? Over the years, archeologists and engineers have tried to answer this question. However all theories of these great occurrences have limitations. This may be because no one truly knows how the ancients of Easter Island lived and how advance their culture may have been. Another reason for these limitations is the natural resources that are available

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