Men in the Philippines

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Philippines Annexation and US Masculinity

    1258 Words  | 5 Pages

    reputation. Due to the nature of the country at that moment in time, the American government wanted to prove their superiority among other emerging nations and in doing so chose to colonize and annex nations such as the Philippines. Primary resources indicated that the annexation of the Philippines was indeed motivated by the lack of masculinity that was felt by the American government at the time (Hollitz, 2010). Gender roles in the United States were at a point where their stereotypical reputations were

  • Annexation Of The Philippines

    998 Words  | 4 Pages

    purpose of this article is: To bring to the light the many reasons that the Americans decided to annex the Philippines and how they were mostly all connected to the main reason. This main reason being that they had an overriding fear about the decline in American masculinity. 2. The key question the author is addressing is: What were some of the reasons for America wanting to annex the Philippines in the first place, and how did they connect to the main reason of the fear of declining masculinity?

  • Summary Of Servants Of Globalization

    1022 Words  | 5 Pages

    the country. Specifically throughout the Philippines, it is more common for migrant workers to be female, resulting in the overall structure and dynamics of these families to change. In the novel, Servants of Globalization, author Rhacel Parreñas addresses how the pre-existing structure of gender expectations and unequal employment opportunities for male and females abroad influence the overall gender patterns and impacts of migration from the Philippines, ultimately affecting the dynamics of families

  • Intercultural Interaction : My Family Friend Tiffany Ramseur From The Philippines

    978 Words  | 4 Pages

    interactive essay is about my family friend Tiffany Ramseur from the Philippines. The Philippines is a Southeastern Country in the Western Pacific comprising more than 7,000 islands. Its capital, Manila, is famous for its waterfront promenade and centuries-old Chinatown, Binondo. Intramuros, a walled city in colonial times, is the heart of Old Manila. The Philippines population is 100,998,376. The Politics of the Philippines take place in an organized framework of a presidential, representative

  • The Bataan Death March : A Brutal Journey Through Malnutrition

    1598 Words  | 7 Pages

    soldiers were attacked in the Philippines by Japan. American and Filipino soldiers fought for as long as we could before we surrendered to the Japanese. Japan took 76,000 hostages and marched them across the Philippines. This horrific journey was know as the Bataan Death March. The Bataan Death March was a ruthless, brutal journey through malnutrition, illness, persecution and ultimately death.(Norman,2015) On December 7, 1942, hours prior to the attack on the Philippines, Japan attacked America

  • History Of Us Annexation Of The Philippines

    367 Words  | 2 Pages

    to John Hollitz, in the 20th century the US became an imperialistic leading global player that emphasized the need to spread “civilization” and build an empire in areas such as the Philippines. (pg. 83). In line with Hollitz, Kristin L. Hoganson argues that during the twentieth century, US annexation of the Philippines became essential for its commercial and geographically advantageous position in Asia. The US also felt it was their “God-given duty” to “guide” Filipino savages, who were “unfit” to

  • Analysis Of ' Thinking Through The Past ' By John Hollitz

    1789 Words  | 8 Pages

    study shall revolve around the debate, which took place over Philippines, and significance of gender in such controversy. There shall be some views highlighted given by Kristin L. Hoganson on gender concerns. Role played by gender in the debate over the Philippines The primary source encompasses a chapter that reflects upon male degeneracy in a debate over Philippines. There are numerous incidents that had taken place surrounding Philippines as indicated in U.S. history. The primary source editor

  • Describe What Your Source Material Say About The Family As A Social Institution?

    1046 Words  | 5 Pages

    is different between the two countries? (25 points) The country selected outside of the United States is the Philippines. Family as a social institution in the Philippines revolves around specific values such as, family loyalty, obligation and interdependence. These values are a large part of the Filipino heritage, creating a strong family structure and close relationships. In the Philippines, it is tradition

  • Immigrants In The Philippines

    922 Words  | 4 Pages

    reasons such as political and poverty. They were able to through trading ships and after the Spanish-American War. Once here, they faced prejudice and discrimination, including in our own state, Washington. The first wave of immigrants from the Philippines to America was during the period when the country was under Spanish rule and formed part of the Spanish East Indies. People were migrating through the Spanish trading ships that were called ‘Manila Galleons’, these ran across the Pacific Ocean from

  • The Bataan Death March : A Brutal Journey Through Malnutrition

    1606 Words  | 7 Pages

    soldiers were attacked in the Philippines by Japan. American and Filipino soldiers fought for as long as we could before we surrendered to the Japanese. Japan took 76,000 hostages and marched them across the Philippines. This horrific journey was known as the Bataan Death March. The Bataan Death March was a ruthless, brutal journey through malnutrition, illness, persecution and ultimately death.(Norman,2015) On December 7, 1942, hours prior to the attack on the Philippines, Japan attacked America

Previous
Page12345678950