A Comparison of Fahrenheit 451 and Dover Beach Essay

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     Fahrenheit 451 is a well-written book that tells a story of a dream world and one man who wakes up from that dream. Montag, the protagonist of the story, brings home a book of poetry one day and begins to read the poem Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold to his wife and her guests. Many critics think that Bradbury picked this poem because it paralleled life in his book. The poem Dover Beach can be compared to Fahrenheit 451 because both pieces of writing talk about themes of true love, fantasy and allover hopelessness.
     One of the ways Fahrenheit 451 can be related to Arnold’s Dover Beach is by connecting the absense of true love in both of them. Throughout the book, Montag slowly
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Firemen are there to keep the peace. Beatty even says to Montag "I don't think you realize how important you are, we are, to our happy world as it stands now (62)". He is implying that they, being the firemen, keep the world that they live in happy, because that is the world they are used to being happy in. Their land of nonsense information is their dream world that people live in without thinking of other possibilities for living. The beauty of the real world is masked by the tall buildings of the city, which the firemen keep up to make the people happy. When people are discovered hiding books in their houses, they are letting the light of the real world show through. Outside of the city, the real world really shines through. The gang of men who memorize books is showing that the real world does exist, though it cannot fully be real without the actual books. In the poem Dover Beach, Arnold says "the world, which seems to lie before us like a land of dreams, so various, so beautiful, so new, Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain...". This can be compared to Bradbury's dream world of the city, which is a land of dreams, yet has no real love, joy, or peace. Yet, "we are here as on a darkling plain".
     Both Arnold and Bradbury use their writings to talk about the cycles of life and its