A White Cup : A Green Circle

1249 Words5 Pages
A white cup. A green circle. This mental image is all it takes to trigger within most people a myriad of connections to one famous company – and more importantly, their brand. This type of marketing is an advertiser’s dream; every mental connection, whether conscious or not, to a brand is another step toward a sale, and this caffeine behemoth is interested in selling their customers more than just a latte. Starbucks uses a number of overt and implicit techniques in the marketing of their personal image to lure in as many customers as possible, by offering them an experience of prosperity, simplicity, and connection. Purchasing a drink from Starbucks is undeniably less of a transaction than it is an experience. Infamous for their…show more content…
Starbucks is and has always been a coffee shop. Some of its main competitors include McDonald’s and Dunkin Donuts, who started as a fast food restaurant and donut shop respectively. Because Starbucks helped introduce “gourmet” coffee and espresso to the popular culture, they continue to function as an educator of the public in coffee culture. This helps paint Starbucks as a leader and innovator in their market, giving them yet another advantage over their competitors.
In the 1990’s, Starbucks’ then-iconic logo was featured in television and film, boosting its popularity and cementing the Starbucks brand as more than a store, but as a part of popular culture. A cup with the smiling white-on-green Siren symbolizes so much more than who is enjoying our hard-earned money, but what exactly is the Siren saying? Thanks to the likes of Sex and the City’s Carrie Bradshaw and The Devil Wears Prada’s Miranda, Starbucks has become more than a part of popular culture, it is a part of upper-class culture. This perception of the Starbucks brand is vital to their prosperity; a purchase of over-priced coffee from Starbucks is indicative of one’s own financial prosperity. Because the outrageous prices of Starbucks’ products are an established part of our cultural consciousness, when we see someone carrying a drink from Starbucks, we assume they have enough money to spend more than necessary on something as frivolous as Starbucks (Klara). This is not
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